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Tech at Night: FCC is still a problem. GOP vs UN-run Internet. Snowden complains ironically.

Tech at Night

I know, I’m late again. Turns out after being sick my body’s just been exhausted recovering. We’ll be better off next week.

Ajit Pai came to RedState on Friday to tell us about the Zapple Doctrine was being used by the FCC to stifle freedom of speech, specifically to try to hinder Scott Walker. The Zapple Doctrine is now dead, but we need to check the FCC to keep it from returning.

Broadcasters also want to check the FCC but they’re going to the courts, the same way ISPs had to over Net Neutrality.

And House Republicans are hard at work to shut Net Neutrality down again, after the courts already had to slap it down twice before.

By the way, the extreme Net Neutrality alternative pushed by the far left, Title II Reclassification? It’s even worse, and runs directly counter to the deregulatory purpose of the Telecommunications Act.

Speaking of House Republicans, they also want to protect the Internet and freedom of speech on the Internet by keeping the UN, Russia, and China from hijacking ICANN, the organization that runs a lot of the Internet’s basic rules of the road, and keeps different networks compatible with each other. Naturally the surrendercrats and their industry donors think differently, showing how ridiculous people are when they say Republicans and Democrats are all the same.

The traitor Edward Snowden may have gotten an infomercial on NBC, but a href=”http://thehill.com/policy/technology/207622-snowden-email-fell-short-of-nsa-criticism”>NSA refuted his claims in that interview. It’s amusing though to see that he’s actually claiming that the document release made by NSA was incomplete and misleading. The guy who fled to China and Russia wants us to believe his documents are full and genuine, but NSA’s are cherrypicked and lying. Heh.

Senate Democrats caved to the lawyer lobby on patent troll reform, but House Republicans continue to fight for something. Even better: the GOP idea currently isn’t a big comprehensive bill!

If you or I distributed a song from 1971 on the Internet without paying for a license, we’d be breaking the law. When radio does it, it’s perfectly legal. It’s time we fixed that, don’t you think?

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