SEARCH ALL ARTICLES BY RightinSanFrancisco:
Graduate: USAF Academy; Georgetown University; USAF Intelligence School Employment History: Pabst Brewing (VP): Kraft Foods (VP) Political History: Served in the Office of the Secretary of Defense (International Security Affairs); 2 Terms on Glendale (Wisc.) School Board; member Oakland (CA) Military Institute charter school Board Hobbies: Politics; Financial Management; Writing Author of: - www.RightinSanFrancisco.com (weekly op-ed blog) - The Target - nuclear terrorism thriller

RECENT ARTICLES

    Syria: The Pelosi Factor

    This is speculation. Generally, one of the benefits of blogging is the ability to embed authoritative links – to polls, to news articles, to expert analysis. This week there are no links, just speculation. The premise: President Obama understood that he’d been badly thrashed by Vladimir Putin and he reached out to the one resource who could match the Russian’s political cunning and ruthlessness – the former House Speaker who had | Read More »

    In Putin We Trust

    Like “nature or nurture” in child rearing, historians can argue about the importance of the individual in the rise and fall of nations – the Mongols without Genghis Khan; the ancient Persians without Cyrus; the Romans without Julius Ceasar; Germany without Hitler; England without Winston Churchill. Vladimir Putin has benefited from vast energy resources, a weak Europe, and a weaker Barack Obama, but he has | Read More »

    In Search of a Syrian Strategy

    Getting past the politics – both domestic and international – almost all of the discussion about Syria in Congress and the media is about tactics. Outside of the context of a broad and consistent strategy tactics are futile. It is no wonder that people really don’t have an answer as to whether a token strike should take place; it is no wonder that liberals like | Read More »

    Seeking Clarity in Syria

    Carl von Clausewitz, the great Prussian military theorist of the early 19th century who discussed war as being an extension of politics, also spoke of the “fog of war” - how in the face of incomplete, dubious, and often completely erroneous information and high levels of fear, doubt, and excitement it was necessary for alert commanders to make rapid decisions – both on the battlefield and at a | Read More »

    Lessons From Cairo

    We can at least learn from the mess that is Egypt 1. With some allowances for effective campaigning and demagoguery, democracy results in a governemnt which reflects the wishes of a majority of the people. There is no reason to think that would reflect the values or policies of Brussels or Washington D.C. or the interests of minority voter groups. The Egyptian street wanted Morsi, knowing full | Read More »

    Defeating the “Inevitable” Hillary

    It is way too early. We’ve got a Congressional election to get through. And Obamacare implementation. And more datapoints on the decline of Obama’s America – more from Putin, Egypt, Syria, and al Queda; more from the unemployment lines, the NSA, and the IRS. But let’s take a moment to look over the horizon to the potential for a better day. Let’s respond to the increasing | Read More »

    Two Paramount Financial Truths

    The next few months – with the October 1 start of the FY14 budget and the projected $17 trillion debt limit breach by early November - will look like Crazy Season in Washington. With both sides in full political posture mode, two obvious paramount factors risk being obscured. 1. Obamacare will not be repealed. The House has tried this 40 times; a dozen conservative Senators have stated their opinion; Republicans | Read More »

    Reining In the National Security Agency

        On July 24, 94 House Republicans and 111 House Democrats voted to de-fund the National Security Agency’s collection of telephone records – “just metadata” in the administration”s vernacular. Republican and Democratic leadership and the Obama administration narrowly defeated the revolt, but the unquestioned prioritization of national security over individual liberty has ended. The joining of Republican libertarians with Democratic liberals reflected a rapid and major shift | Read More »

    Escalating the Numbing Corruption

    In discussing political corruption there is some risk of sounding like an Old Testament soothsayer, decrying society’s loss of a moral compass as in the story of Lot’s wife or Moses’ destruction of the golden idol.  As Obamacare rolls out there will be massive systemic problems, but the greatest damage is the invitation to corruption inherent in the way that the exchanges are being organized. In the | Read More »

    The Sad Senate: Present and Future

    Harry Reid and Mitch McConnell have a lot in common: both are long term products of the Senate’s fight against meritocracy; neither has a lock on the voters of their home state; both are happy to let subordinates (Chuck Schumer; Marco Rubio/John McCain) be the face of decision making; both usually seem to be asleep, although Harry may not be. In this week’s stand-off all that McConnell had to | Read More »