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Full results of poll in fast-growing Kansas City suburb – No, voters don’t want “more taxes” and “more services” from government

PART 4 OF 4 about poll in Gardner, Kansas.  You can read part 1 here, part 2 here, and part 3 here.

In August 2011, I polled Kansas’ second-largest city of Overland Park, a suburb of Kansas City, MO.  We learned, in part:

  • 67% of voters wanted to balance the city budget through cuts in spending, and only 23% wanted higher taxes.
  • Asked a different way:  39% of voters wanted cuts of 1-5% in city spending.  29% of voters wanted cuts of 6-10%.  Another 11% wanted cuts greater than 10%.  Only 14% said not to cut spending, and 7% were undecided.
  • 55% of voters were OK with cuts to city services.  34% were not OK with it.  11% were undecided.
  • Taking one of Rasmussen Reports’ questions:  ”Generally speaking, would you prefer a more active government with more services and higher taxes, or a smaller government with fewer services and lower taxes?”
    • 65%  wanted a government with fewer services and lower taxes.

In December 2012, I polled likely April 2013 voters in Gardner, Kansas, which is a young, fast-growing city with a population of about 20,000.  Afterward, we were fortunate to get a front-page article in The Gardner News and a radio interview with KRMR 105.7 FM host Paul Ibbetson.

In short, a bi-partisan super-majority of voters think that taxes are too high in the city of Gardner – while Governor Sam Brownback has a 50% approval rating among likely April 2013 voters, 70% of voters think property taxes are too high.

As I wrote at RedState on December 29:

The city of Gardner, Kansas, is a suburb of Greater Kansas City and one of the fastest growing cities in the state.  In 2010 to 2011, the entire state grew at a 0.6% rate, while Gardner experienced almost three times the growth rate, at 1.6%.  The city grew by 104% between 2000 and 2010.

Gardner appears slightly more conservative than entire state of Kansas:  Gardner voted 62% for Mitt Romney, while state-wide voters supported Romney by a margin of 60%.

Here are the full results of our poll.  The margin of error is larger than I’d like, but I still find the results meaningful.  My PAC is a non-profit and a hobby, and we had a good response rate for an automated poll (it’s just that so few voters participate in April elections, to begin with).  I had a few big-government “Republicans” try to criticize the poll, and my response is simple:  do your own poll and prove me wrong.

For full text and methodology, click here.

About the poll:

  • Party affiliation (by registration in public voter file):
    • 62% Republican
    • 19% Democrat
    • 18% Independent
  • Gender (asked during the poll): 56% female and 44% male
  • Age (asked during the poll): 58% being over the age of 50 and 42% being under age 50
  • An 8.9% margin of error (125 respondents).

For comparison purposes:

Results:

Mayor’s election with 2 candidates – Dave Drovetta vs. Chris Morrow:

Drovetta:  28.8%

Morrow:  25.6%

Undecided:  45.6%

Total: 100.0%


Mayor with 3 candidates – Dave Drovetta vs. Kristi Harrison vs. Chris Morrow
:

Drovetta:  24.0%

Harrison:  14.4%

Morrow:  15.2%

Undecided:  46.4%

Total: 100.0%


President – Who did you vote for in 2012
:

Romney: 63.2%

Obama:  28.0%

Other:  8.8%

Total: 100.0%


Governor approval, Sam Brownback
:

Approve:  50.4%

Disapprove:  34.4%

Undecided:  15.2%

Total: 100.0%


Gardner Mayor approval, Dave Drovetta
:

Approve:  42.4%

Disapprove:  34.4%

Undecided:  23.2%

Total:  100.0%


Property taxes in Gardner
:

Too high:  70.4%

About right:  28.8%

Too low:  0.8%

Total: 100.0%


Tax increases – Do you agree with the 25% tax increrases in the last 4 years
?

Agree:  21.6%

Disagree:  62.4%

Undecided:  16.0%

Total: 100.0%


US Senator Pat Roberts – Should Roberts run for re-election or retire
?

Run for re-election:  25.6%

Retire:  48.0%

Undecided:  26.4%

Total: 100.0%


Favorability, Kris Kobach
:

Very favorable:  31.2%

Somewhat favorable:  24.8%

Somewhat unfavorable:  14.4%

Very unfavorable:  8.0%

No opinion:  12.8%

Have never heard of:  8.8%

Total: 100.0%


Favorability, John Toplikar:

Very favorable:  11.2%

Somewhat favorable:  25.6%

Somewhat unfavorable:  16.0%

Very unfavorable:  12.0%

No opinion:  28.8%

Have never heard of:  6.4%

Total: 100.0%


Favorability, Kevin Yoder:

Very favorable:  32.0%

Somewhat favorable:  31.2%

Somewhat unfavorable:  11.2%

Very unfavorable:  12.0%

No opinion:  13.6%

Have never heard of:  0.0%

Total: 100.0%


Favorability, Chris Morrow:

Very favorable:  15.2%

Somewhat favorable:  27.2%

Somewhat unfavorable:  4.0%

Very unfavorable:  4.0%

No opinion:  28.0%

Have never heard of:  21.6%

Total: 100.0%


Favorability, Ed Eilert
:

Very favorable:  6.4%

Somewhat favorable:  20.8%

Somewhat unfavorable:  9.6%

Very unfavorable:  4.0%

No opinion:  32.0%

Have never heard of:  27.2%

Total: 100.0%


Favorability, Kristi Harrison
:

Very favorable:  10.4%

Somewhat favorable:  19.2%

Somewhat unfavorable:  8.8%

Very unfavorable:  4.8%

No opinion:  33.6%

Have never heard of:  23.2%

Total: 100.0%


Favorability, Annabeth Surbaugh
:

Very favorable:  8.0%

Somewhat favorable:  20.8%

Somewhat unfavorable:  12.0%

Very unfavorable:  6.4%

No opinion:  33.6%

Have never heard of:  19.2%

Total: 100.0%


Favorability, Dave Drovetta
:

Very favorable:  16.0%

Somewhat favorable:  26.4%

Somewhat unfavorable:  16.0%

Very unfavorable:  20.8%

No opinion:  15.2%

Have never heard of:  5.6%

Total: 100.0%


Favorability, Carol Lehman
:

Very favorable:  22.4%

Somewhat favorable:  23.2%

Somewhat unfavorable:  12.0%

Very unfavorable:  9.6%

No opinion:  16.0%

Have never heard of:  16.8%

Total: 100.0%


Political Views
:

Very conservative:  23.2%

Somewhat conservative:  31.2%

Moderate:  31.2%

Somewhat liberal:  10.4%

Very liberal:  4.0%

Total: 100.0%

______________________

Connect with Benjamin Hodge at FacebookTwitterLinkedInGoogle Plus, Tumblr, mrcTV.org, YouTubeThe Kansas Progress, and LibertyLinked. Hodge is President of the State and Local Reform Group of Kansas.  He served as a member of the Kansas House of Representatives, an at-large trustee at Johnson County Community College, a delegate to the Kansas Republican Party, a Republican precinct committeeman in Johnson County, and was founder of the modern Overland Park Republican Party.  His public policy record is recognized by Americans for Prosperity, the Kansas Association of Broadcasters, the Kansas Press Association, the Kansas Sunshine Coalition for Open Government, the NRA, Fox News’ Bill O’Reilly, the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education (FIRE), Kansas’ largest pro-life group, and the Kansas Chamber of Commerce.


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