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Bryan Preston, The Grid Editor-in-Chief, PJ Tatler Editor-at-large and Texas Bureau Chief (@texasbryanp) Bryan Preston keeps our readers in the news loop at The PJ Tatler, where he has been blogging at the speed of news from a pro-liberty conservative viewpoint since 2011. He joined the PJMedia team as a writer, editor and PJTV contributor the previous year. In addition to his work on The Tatler, Preston does investigative work for PJMedia as our Texas bureau chief. He filed one report that revealed the money web dominating Democratic politics in the Lone Star State and another that exposed corruption and criminal activity within the Hidalgo County sheriff's department. The sheriff and several other law enforcers have been sentenced to prison since Preston’s investigation began. Preston came to the blogosphere in its early days, launching his first site all the way back in 2001. The experience he gained as an online innovator served him well when Michelle Malkin recruited him as a founding writer and producer for her video blog, Hot Air. He produced “Vent,” one of the Internet’s first daily conservative video shows. From there Preston switched channels to the traditional airwaves, serving as a producer of the Laura Ingraham Show. Preton also tested the political waters. Before joining the PJMedia team, he served as communications director of the Republican Party of Texas. Early in his media career, Preston reported news about the Hubble Space Telescope as a producer-editor for NASA. His credits include “Hubble Reborn,” a documentary about a mission to repair the telescope. Preston landed the job at NASA after serving four years in Japan while in the Air Force.

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    Shadow Parties and Zombie ACORN

    It’s hard to believe now, but Democrats once had a lock on all power in the state of Texas. From Reconstruction to the 1980s, Republicans might be competitive at the presidential level, but other than picking off a statewide election here or there, had virtually no power. Texas was a one-party state. Texas flipped to Republican control in a slow-motion sweep during the 1980s through | Read More »