According to Philip Haney, former employee and whistleblower of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), while employed at the DHS, he was ordered to scrub the records of Muslims with ties to terror. Haney wrote, in an article at The Hill, that following the 2009 underwear bomber plot, “President Obama threw the intelligence community under the bus for its failure to “connect the dots. This was not a failure to collect intelligence, it was a failure to integrate and understand the intelligence that we already had.”

Haney went on to say:

“Most Americans were unaware of the enormous damage to morale at the Department of Homeland Security, where I worked, his condemnation caused. His words infuriated many of us because we knew his administration had been engaged in a bureaucratic effort to destroy the raw material—the actual intelligence we had collected for years, and erase those dots. The dots constitute the intelligence needed to keep Americans safe, and the Obama administration was ordering they be wiped away.

After leaving my 15 year career at DHS, I can no longer be silent about the dangerous state of America’s counter-terror strategy, our leaders’ willingness to compromise the security of citizens for the ideological rigidity of political correctness—and, consequently, our vulnerability to devastating, mass-casualty attack.”

In early November 2009, Haney was ordered by his superiors at the DHS to delete or revise several hundred records of individuals tied to designated terrorist groups. These records are housed in the Treasury Enforcement Communications System (TECS), a federal database. Haney describes these records as being, “the basis for any ability to ‘connect dots.’”

“Every day, DHS Customs and Border Protection officers watch entering and exiting many individuals associated with known terrorist affiliations, then look for patterns. Enforcing a political scrubbing of records of Muslims greatly affected our ability to do that. Even worse, going forward, my colleagues and I were prohibited from entering pertinent information into the database,” he said.

Haney reflected on the fact that, as he scrubbed away at all this data relevant to preventing terror attacks, “it was going to be vastly more difficult to ‘connect the dots’ in the future—especially before an attack occurs.” Further, “as the number of successful and attempted Islamic terrorist attacks on America increased, the type of information that the Obama administration ordered removed from travel and national security databases was the kind of information that, if properly assessed, could have prevented subsequent domestic Islamist attacks like the ones committed by Faisal Shahzad (May 2010), Detroit ‘honor killing’ perpetrator Rahim A. Alfetlawi (2011); Amine El Khalifi, who plotted to blow up the U.S. Capitol (2012); Dzhokhar or Tamerlan Tsarnaev who conducted the Boston Marathon bombing (2013); Oklahoma beheading suspect Alton Nolen (2014); or Muhammed Yusuf Abdulazeez, who opened fire on two military installations in Chattanooga, Tennessee (2015),” Haney wrote.

The Obama administration has an extensive history of scrubbing, modifying and censoring in relation to Islamic terror:

  • In 2012, the DHS released “Right-wing Extremism: Current Economic and Political Climate Fueling Resurgence in Radicalization and Recruitment” which implied that people with the following viewpoints are potential terrorists: opposition to abortion, opposition to illegal immigration, support of small government, opposition to gun control and concerns over the loss of American sovereignty.

 

  • “Similarly, a 2009 report by the Missouri Information Analysis Center labeled those who have bumper stickers for third-party political candidates such as Ron Paul, Bob Barr, and Chuck Baldwin as suspicious individuals. It further warned law enforcement to watch out for individuals with ‘radical’ ideologies based on Christian views, such as opposing illegal immigration, abortion, and federal taxes.”

 

  • PJ Media pointed out that unmentioned in the report was the 1994 shooting of 16-year-old Jewish student Ari Halberstam by Rashid Baz. Halberstam died and other murders were attempted on the Brooklyn Bridge. Baz was up front about the fact that he shot Halberstam because he was Jewish.

 

  • Also left out of the report was the 2002 shooting at the El Al (Israel's national airline) ticket counter at Los Angeles International Airport.  Hesham Mohamed Hadayet killed two and wounded four others. Hadayet was later determined, by the FBI and DOJ, to be an Egyptian terrorist who wanted to be a Muslim martyr.

 

  • A decorated Army officer who was a war college instructor was fired in 2012 because of his teachings on radical Islam. A four-star general’s rejection of Lt. Col. Matthew Dooley for consideration for command of a combat battalion was the beginning of the end of Dooley’s promising Army career. He was decorated for valor in Iraq and received excellent evaluations

 

  • Dooley’s troubles began when “fifty-seven Muslim organizations signed a letter to the Department of Defense demanding that training materials offensive to them be purged and instructors disciplined. Eventually the letter was passed to General Martin E. Dempsey, Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. This was shortly followed by a Defense Department press release condemning the course material being taught as not ‘simply objectionable’ but ‘inflammable.’ Later on General Dempsey would say that the course’s content was ‘totally objectionable’ and ‘against our values.’”

 

 

  • Another indicator of the Obama administration’s efforts to thwart progress against the jihad was the cancellation of an anti-terrorism conference scheduled for August 10-12 in 2011 which was to be hosted by the CIA’s Threat Management Unit.

 

  • That cancellation was followed, in September 2011, by several articles written by WIRED Magazine's Spencer Ackerman. The articles claimed that counter-terrorism trainers and materials used by the FBI were promoting “Islamophobia.”

 

  • “While a number of claims made by Ackerman in his series of articles were later found to be manifestly false, inside U.S. government agencies individuals targeted by Ackerman’s articles were prohibited from speaking publicly in defense of themselves and their work and ‘The Purge’ continued apace.”

 

  • “One of the architects of the new DHS guidelines was Mohamed Elibiary, who served on the DHS Countering Violent Extremism Working Group, was appointed in October 2010 by Secretary Janet Napolitano to the Homeland Security Advisory Council and is now a senior fellow for the agency, who has publicly admitted to his role in developing the DHS guidelines. Unsurprisingly, he was a regular source for WIRED’s Spencer Ackerman.”

 

 

  • Some of the same organizations that the Office of Civil Rights and Civil Liberties affiliated itself with had been identified by the DOJ as fronts for international terrorist organizations in the Holy Land Foundation terrorism financing trial in 2007 and 2008. This would include the Islamic Society of North America (ISNA), the North American Islamic Trust (NAIT) and the Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR).

 

  • “At the time these guidelines were published, the president of ISNA, Imam Mohamed Majid, was serving on the DHS Countering Violent Extremism Working Group.”

According to an article at The Blaze, written in 2014 by Patrick Poole, “In what some experts have termed a hostile “political warfare campaign” driven by an alliance between the administration, Islamic organizations and cooperating media figures, analysts and subject matter experts were blacklisted, and books and training materials were purged from official counter-terrorism training programs government-wide. This ‘purge’ has contributed to clues being missed by the FBI in major terrorism cases, including last year’s bombing of the Boston Marathon…”

So, a decision was made to purge all federal government training materials of anything deemed biased, initiate mandatory re-training program for FBI agents and disciple educators and other government employees who taught using “biased” materials.

In December 2011, the White House issued the “Strategic Implementation Plan for Empowering Local Partners to Prevent Violent Extremism in the United States.” It mandated the use of local partners--Islamic organizations, including those cited by the DOJ as providing support to foreign terrorist organizations.

Hence, all national security and law enforcement agencies at the federal, state and local level have had to consult these groups and coordinate with “local partners” as a matter of policy.