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“We the people” get the government we tolerate

“We the people” will never get our elected public servants to take their oaths of office seriously unless we demand that they do so and demonstrate to them that we have read and studied the Constitution and adore it and demand that they strictly adhere to and obey it.

Some at the town hall meetings are doing so. Here are two examples:

I believe the starting point of any conversation with an elected representative is to force them to acknowledge their oath and than force them to cite language from the Constitution for the powers they assert over us.

Note how Ben Cardin explained Article I, Section 8 granted him “broad powers” because of the “general welfare” clause. Wrong. The powers so granted are limited and enumerated, and the general welfare clause only refers to the idea that all laws passed by Congress were to have general applicability; the general welfare clause is not a broad grant of legislative authority.

Article VI, in pertinent part, requires “The Senators and Representatives before mentioned, and the members of the several state legislatures, and all executive and judicial officers, both of the United States and of the several states, shall be bound by oath or affirmation, to support this Constitution . . . .”

Article VI also declares that only “This Constitution, and the laws of the United States which shall be made in pursuance thereof . . . shall be the supreme law of the land . . . .”

In other words, as the Supreme Court has ruled, laws enacted, but not allowed by, the Constitution (that is, “in pursuance thereof,” are a nullity.

The Preamble of the Constitution informs why “we the people” established it:

We the people of the United States, in order to form a more perfect union, establish justice, insure domestic tranquility, provide for the common defense, promote the general welfare, and secure the blessings of liberty to ourselves and our posterity, do ordain and establish this Constitution for the United States of America.

Below, Ben Cardin claims power to legislate over healthcare based on the “general welfare” clause of Article I, Section 8 of the Constitution. But note that the Preamble informs us that “we the people” ordained and establish the Constitution to “promote” the general welfare, not “provide for” it as “for the common defense.”

Article I, Section 1 declares “All legislative powers herein granted shall be vested in a Congress of the United States, which shall consist of a Senate and House of Representatives.

Article I, Section 8 grants certain limited, enumerated powers to the Congress; there is no sweeping language granting Congress authority to legislate in an area that traditionally has always been thought to be one’s personal responsibility: one’s own health.

And, if the foregoing was not made clear to the newly formed federal government “ordained and established” by “we the people,” the Bill of Rights was designed to make things even more clear. Specifically, the Tenth Amendment clearly states, “The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the states, are reserved to the states respectively, or to the people.”

I never gave my right to be responsible for my own health to the federal government, and neither did the framers of the Constitution. As the Constitution so clearly states.

Nor do I care to assume responsibility for the healthcare of others. I will and do give my hard earned dollars to those less fortunate. But I do not believe, for example, I should have to pay for the abortions others choose to remedy the negative impacts on the health of others caused by their foolish, unhealthy lifestyle choices. Our forefathers fought and died for an America that was designed to allow each of us to “pursue Happiness,” not make others pay for it. I have no claim on the charity of others; nor do they have a claim on mine.

So why do our current legislators in the U.S. House and Senate usurp this power to force us into socialized medicine and “Cap and Tax” and all the rest? Because we do not DEMAND that they cease doing so.

Well, at least some are making the demand.

Thank you.

ColdWarrior

P.S. I’ve set forth below the full text of the passages of the Constitution I’ve referenced above.

The Preamble:

We the people of the United States, in order to form a more perfect union, establish justice, insure domestic tranquility, provide for the common defense, promote the general welfare, and secure the blessings of liberty to ourselves and our posterity, do ordain and establish this Constitution for the United States of America.
Article I
Section 1. All legislative powers herein granted shall be vested in a Congress of the United States, which shall consist of a Senate and House of Representatives.
. . .
Section 8. The Congress shall have power to lay and collect taxes, duties, imposts and excises, to pay the debts and provide for the common defense and general welfare of the United States; but all duties, imposts and excises shall be uniform throughout the United States;
To borrow money on the credit of the United States;
To regulate commerce with foreign nations, and among the several states, and with the Indian tribes;
To establish a uniform rule of naturalization, and uniform laws on the subject of bankruptcies throughout the United States;
To coin money, regulate the value thereof, and of foreign coin, and fix the standard of weights and measures;
To provide for the punishment of counterfeiting the securities and current coin of the United States;
To establish post offices and post roads;
To promote the progress of science and useful arts, by securing for limited times to authors and inventors the exclusive right to their respective writings and discoveries;
To constitute tribunals inferior to the Supreme Court;
To define and punish piracies and felonies committed on the high seas, and offenses against the law of nations;
To declare war, grant letters of marque and reprisal, and make rules concerning captures on land and water;
To raise and support armies, but no appropriation of money to that use shall be for a longer term than two years;
To provide and maintain a navy;
To make rules for the government and regulation of the land and naval forces;
To provide for calling forth the militia to execute the laws of the union, suppress insurrections and repel invasions;
To provide for organizing, arming, and disciplining, the militia, and for governing such part of them as may be employed in the service of the United States, reserving to the states respectively, the appointment of the officers, and the authority of training the militia according to the discipline prescribed by Congress;
To exercise exclusive legislation in all cases whatsoever, over such District (not exceeding ten miles square) as may, by cession of particular states, and the acceptance of Congress, become the seat of the government of the United States, and to exercise like authority over all places purchased by the consent of the legislature of the state in which the same shall be, for the erection of forts, magazines, arsenals, dockyards, and other needful buildings;–And
To make all laws which shall be necessary and proper for carrying into execution the foregoing powers, and all other powers vested by this Constitution in the government of the United States, or in any department or officer thereof.

Article VI
All debts contracted and engagements entered into, before the adoption of this Constitution, shall be as valid against the United States under this Constitution, as under the Confederation.
This Constitution, and the laws of the United States which shall be made in pursuance thereof; and all treaties made, or which shall be made, under the authority of the United States, shall be the supreme law of the land; and the judges in every state shall be bound thereby, anything in the Constitution or laws of any State to the contrary notwithstanding.
The Senators and Representatives before mentioned, and the members of the several state legislatures, and all executive and judicial officers, both of the United States and of the several states, shall be bound by oath or affirmation, to support this Constitution; but no religious test shall ever be required as a qualification to any office or public trust under the United States.

Amendment X
The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the states, are reserved to the states respectively, or to the people.

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