SEARCH ALL ARTICLES BY Marita Noon:
Marita Noon is the executive director for Energy Makes America Great Inc. and the companion educational organization, the Citizens’ Alliance for Responsible Energy (CARE). Together they work to educate the public and influence policy makers regarding energy, its role in freedom, and the American way of life. Combining energy, news, politics, and the environment through public events, speaking engagements, and media, the organizations’ combined efforts have made Marita “America’s voice for energy.” Marita is also a regular contributor to Conservative Action Alerts, Canada Free Press, and EPAAbuse.com. Additionally her writing can be found in numerous newspapers and websites. Marita’s twentieth book, Energy Freedom, is her first in the current affairs genre. As a conservative commentator and energy expert, she is known as Marita Noon. Readers of Marita’s previous books, including best sellers, Wired That Way and Communication Plus, know her as Marita Littauer. Prior to her work in energy, Marita was known as a motivational speaker and author. She has trained thousands of men and women in spoken and written communication.

RECENT ARTICLES

    Marita Noon: U.S. light dimmed with Obama energy policy

    While India chips away at regulations, the Obama administration continues to pile them on—first against coal-fueled electricity generation, and now aimed at the oil-and-gas industry. His policies, such as the Clean Power Plan (CPP), and the new methane regulations announced on January 14 (just to name two) will kill jobs and raise energy costs. (Both the CPP and the new methane regulations aim to reduce so-called greenhouse gases that alarmists claim are the drivers of climate change. The CPP: carbon dioxide; the methane regulations: methane that leaks from oil and gas wells.)

    Read More »

    Marita Noon: Wind energy’s bluster peters out

    …the Department of Energy (DOE), which seems to indiscriminately throw money at any politically favored green-energy project, was tepid in its support for Cape Wind. DOE’s loan guarantees generally average about 60 percent of the project’s costs, but the $150 million offered to Cape Wind made up a mere 6 percent—and that, only after the project received commitments for about half of its financing. In most cases, the government guarantee comes before the private financing and signals a go-ahead for investors.

    Read More »

    Marita Noon: Obama Administration kicks the oil-and-gas industry while it is down

    I have warned the industry that while they have remained relatively unscathed by harsh regulations—such as those placed on electricity generation—their time would come. Now, it has arrived. The WSJ concurs: “In its first six years, the administration released very few regulations directly affecting the oil-and-gas industry and instead rolled out several significant rules aimed at cutting air pollution from the coal and electric-utility sectors.”

    Read More »

    Marita Noon: Ethanol policy reform—the rare place where environmentalists and energy advocates agree

    Today the U.S. is the world’s largest natural-gas producer and is projected to pass Saudi Arabia as the number one oil producer. With crude oil supplies flooding the market, prices have been cut in half. Although fears over foreign-oil dependence have abated, the U.S. remains stuck with an ethanol mandate that is outdated, unworkable, and even harmful to vehicles, engines, and the environment.

    Read More »

    Marita Noon: Obama’s climate change polices are a pHraud

    “Ocean acidification” (OA) is receiving growing attention. While someone who doesn’t follow climate change science might think OA is a stomach condition resulting from eating bad seafood, OA is claimed to be a phenomenon that will destroy ocean life—all due to mankind’s use of fossil fuels. It is a foundational theory upon which the global warming/climate change narrative is built. The science and engineering website | Read More »

    Marita Noon: Germany’s “energy transformation” — unsustainable subsidies and an unstable system

    What should the U.S., and other countries, learn from Germany’s generous subsidy programs and rapid, large-scale deployment and integration of renewable energy into the power system? These are the questions U.S. legislators should be asking themselves as they argue over a tax extender package that includes a retroactive extension for the now-expired Production Tax Credit for wind energy.

    Read More »

    Marita Noon: Welcome to the O-zone—where economic development is a zero-sum game

    While environmental groups and the Obama administration maybe feel, “emboldened,” more regulation—especially that which “would impose too severe a burden on industry and local governments”—is not what the American people want or need.

    Read More »

    Marita Noon: It’s time for tough love on tax credits for the mature wind industry

    The PTC provides one of the best examples of the worst kind of taxpayer waste being considered in a tax-extenders deal. The largest benefactors of the credit (underwritten by U.S. taxpayers) are wind energy turbine manufacturers like General Electric (which purchased Enron’s wind turbine business in 2002), and investors like Warren Buffet, who, without apology, recently admitted: “We get a tax credit if we build a lot of wind farms. That’s the only reason to build them. They don’t make sense without the tax credit.”

    Read More »

    Marita Noon: Dear Northeast, How’s that solar working out for ya?

    The lessons for America’s energy supply learned from the Northeast’s far-reaching experiment, that has only resulted only in price increases and potential energy shortages, are twofold. First, don’t shut down existing supply until the replacement is ready, as legal action and local attitudes can slow its development. Second, you can cover every square inch of available land with wind and solar, but when extreme weather hits, it requires a reliable energy supply, best met by coal and nuclear.

    Read More »

    Marita Noon: Six energy policy changes to watch for in a Republican-controlled Congress

    For those of us who watch the politics of energy policy, it is going to be an interesting two years. If the Republican policies turn the economy around as predicted—offering a sharp contrast to the stagnation of the past six years, they will pave the way for victory in 2016.

    Read More »