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EDITOR OF REDSTATE

National Review Rains On the Show

Standing safely off the road, abiding by all applicable rules and guidelines, suggesting in a safe and non-threatening manner that history should change lanes.

Several conservatives in the House tell me they are hacked off at National Review for a blurb that appears in the print edition of the magazine this week. Here is what National Review writes:

After the House adjourned for summer recess without voting on an energy bill, half a dozen Republicans stayed in the empty chamber, razzing the majority and calling for offshore drilling. Their number swelled to about 20 as word got out; tourists and aides were invited in; though the C-SPAN cameras were switched off, the Republicans sent reports of their doings via Twitter, and cellphone to Rush Limbaugh. Great fun was had by all, and scientists agree there may indeed be life in the House GOP caucus. But seriously, folks. Legislative bodies have rules for good reason: to maintain decorum, to see that business is done, to protect both majority and minority rights. The saving comedy of American politics allows us to write this off as a stunt — so long as everyone knows it was unseemly, and plans not to make a habit of it.

Congressman Tom Price has a post this morning about the protest on the House floor. Price, along with other conservative standard bearers in the House like Mike Pence, Jeb Hensarling, and Lynn Westmoreland organized, implemented, and led this effort.

Let’s go through the whole paragraph:

After the House adjourned for summer recess without voting on an energy bill, half a dozen Republicans stayed in the empty chamber, razzing the majority and calling for offshore drilling.

What was really not mentioned was that there was going to be a vote and Nancy abruptly adjourned the House when her side calculated that enough Republicans were tied up in a meeting with Paul Weyrich’s group that they’d have the votes to adjourn before any energy legislation could come up.

Likewise “razzing” the majority is a bit much. The speeches have all been very good, very pointed, and very detailed, pointing out sharp differences.

Their number swelled to about 20 as word got out; tourists and aides were invited in; though the C-SPAN cameras were switched off, the Republicans sent reports of their doings via Twitter, and cellphone to Rush Limbaugh.

The passive voice on the cameras should be more like this: “The Speaker ordered the cameras and lights turned off and tried to evict people from the galleries.” The “number swelled to about 20″ should more be “Republicans rotated into the chamber daily with ten members and have continued to do so.”

Great fun was had by all, and scientists agree there may indeed be life in the House GOP caucus.

Way to make it sound frivolous, National Review. I’m sure the members, like Marsha Blackburn who was facing a primary challenge that week, were having a blast avoiding the campaign trail and calls from local press to come home and defend herself against her opponent.

But seriously, folks.

They were serious. Apparently seriousness doesn’t translate too well in Manhattan. Maybe if you guys filled up cars with gas more often, it’d translate better.

Legislative bodies have rules for good reason: to maintain decorum, to see that business is done, to protect both majority and minority rights.

Yes, and when the majority tells the minority it will do something and then abruptly adjourns so it does not have to keep its word, that is really getting business done!

The saving comedy of American politics allows us to write this off as a stunt — so long as everyone knows it was unseemly, and plans not to make a habit of it.

Way to undermine the most effective thing the GOP has done in several years. Bravo National Review. In one sentence you have cut the legs out from under your conservative brethren standing on the House floor doing a heck of a lot more than the Democrats have done.

National Review: Standing safely off the road, abiding by all applicable rules and guidelines, suggesting in a safe and non-threatening manner that history should change lanes.

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