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EDITOR OF REDSTATE

Responding to Stern Emails From Speaker Boehner’s Office

I’m getting stern emails from Speaker Boehner’s Office about my prior post. The Speaker is not happy with me.The feeling is mutual the more I learn of this budget deal.Here’s the first email:

Subject: This is False“Turns out it does not cut $38.5 billion. According to the Congressional Budget Office, it only cuts $353 million.”From story: “The CBO study confirms that the measure trims $38 billion in new spending authority.” I understand you’re opposed, but at least be accurate.

Okay, I should have said “cuts the deficit $353 million.”But we’re playing with semantics here. Note what I said: “cuts $353 million.”Now note what the Speaker’s Office points out from the CBO analysis: “the measure trims $38 billion in new spending authority.”I think I’ll stand by what it being cut, because a cut implies something is going down — in the case of what we always have been talking about, the deficit.The Speaker’s Office also sent this email:

Subject: This also not true“It’s just the *deficit* only gets cut $353 million.”353 million in the next 6 months, but 315 billion over a decade. For example from the story: “CBO does credit a move to eliminate year-round Pell Grants with generating more than $40 billion in deficit reduction over the coming decade from both mandatory and appropriated accounts, though just slightly less than $1 billion this year.”

So . . . we are only cutting the deficit $353 million this year? I haven’t been talking about the next decade. No one has. And $315 billion over the next ten years is one grain of sand on deficit beach. This year’s deficit is $1.5 TRILLION.I’d just point out that John Boehner said on February 11, 2011, “We are going to cut $100 billion in discretionary spending next week. Write it down. $100 billion in discretionary spending. And we aren’t going to stop there.”Oh, lastly we also know the spending baseline went up $3.3 billion. The net, bottom line IMPACT is that the CR will only reduce discretionary spending by $352 million this fiscal year (once all the smoke and mirrors are cleared).

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