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The Olympic Charter A Crock

The Olympic charter says, “The practice of sport is a human right. Every individual must have the possibility of practicing sport without discrimination of any kind and in the Olympic spirit, which requires mutual understanding with a spirit of friendship, solidarity, and fair play.”

What a crock.

Fine and dandy if this is the goal that the Olympics aspires to.

But if this principle is to be elevated to the status of a human right extended beyond this borderline criminal racket, its implications could be downright frightening.

For example, the opening statement postulates that every individual must have the possibility of participating in sport.

What if an individual’s parents refuse to grant permission?

Should the child be snatched from the home on the grounds of child abuse?

And conversely, if the International Olympic Committee is so eager to hand down grandiose moral pronouncements, will this august body uphold the principle that it is the human right of every individual NOT to participate in sports, free of coercion?

For example, what about the case of Red China where child athletes are snatched from their families to be mercilessly trained in what are little better than glorified slave labor camps? And to bring the issue back a little closer to home, what of the child whose classmates refuse to let him participate in a playground pick up game?

Granted, such bullying and exclusion is quite saddening.

However, it hardly rises to the level of an atrocity worthy of a UN human rights tribunal. Most of all, it must be asked isn’t the International Olympic Committee violating the very spirit of the principles the organization’s charter claims to embody.

For example, the charter insists that EVERY individual must have the possibility of practicing sport WITHOUT DISCRIMINATION OF ANY KIND.

So does that mean a 300 pound geriatric alcoholic with equilibrium issues should be allowed to ascend the balance beam during the prime time broadcast?

If not, isn’t that a form of discrimination and exclusion?

Fascinating, isn’t it that these internationalist organizations renowned for advocating the fundamentals of socialism for everyone else the world over insist that the activities undertaken under their own auspices publicly be characterized by the utmost meritocracy.

By Frederick Meekins

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