Fred Campbell is Director of the Center for Boundless Innovation in Technology (CBIT). He is also an adjunct professor in the Space, Cyber, and Telecommunications Law LL.M program at the University of Nebraska College of Law and former President and CEO of the Wireless Communications Association International. He previously served as Chief of the Wireless Telecommunications Bureau at the Federal Communications Commission and as Wireless Legal Advisor to former Chairman Kevin Martin. He earned his B.A. from the State University of New York and his J.D., with high distinction, from the University of Nebraska College of Law.


    Sprint’s Decision To Skip Wireless Auction “Highlights The Folly” Of Federal Hubris

    Few industry analysts seemed surprised when Sprint’s new CEO announced “after thorough analysis” that the company won’t participate in next year’s auction of TV broadcast spectrum (known as the “incentive auction”). Analysts already knew that Sprint “has the spectrum it needs to deploy its network architecture of the future.” As a senior telecommunications analyst for Bloomberg Intelligence said in response to the news, “Sprint really | Read More »

    New Net Neutrality Order Is a Nadir for the First Amendment & Internet Freedom

    The First Amendment is premised on a simple idea: Ensuring mass media communications are free of government control is a “precondition to enlightened self-government and a necessary means to protect it.” Though this principle should be obvious, it has been lost in application to the Internet age. In its recent order adopting net neutrality rules and reclassifying Internet access as a common carrier service subject to telephone regulation | Read More »

    ICANN, Meet Your New Master, the FCC

    The National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA), an executive branch agency within the Department of Commerce, sparked controversy last year when it announced its intent to transition its oversight of Internet domain names to “the global multistakeholder community.” The controversy is now over. The NTIA no longer has authority to relinquish U.S. control over the Internet domain name system. Though few seem to have realized it, the FCC assumed | Read More »

    FCC Net Neutrality Ideology Out of Step with Internet Reality

    “Today, we celebrate the first glorious anniversary of the Information Purification Directives. We have created, for the first time in all history, a garden of pure ideology—where each worker may bloom, secure from the pests purveying contradictory truths. Our Unification of Thoughts is more powerful a weapon than any fleet or army on earth. We are one people, with one will, one resolve, one cause. | Read More »

    Government Broadband Plan Would Move US Policy to the Left of Europe

    From the diaries… Last year the European Union (EU) ruled that government owned broadband networks are harmful to competition and counterproductive to broadband deployment in markets with private competitors — like the market in Cedar Falls, Iowa where the President spoke. In a speech preceding the State of the Union Address, President Obama said that preempting state laws prohibiting municipalities from owning broadband networks puts him on the | Read More »

    Congressional Investigation of FCC Spells Trouble for Net Neutrality

    Did the FCC chairman change his mind about Title II on his own, or did he capitulate to White House demands to avoid the disgrace of losing his chairmanship? A shocking investigative report by The Wall Street Journal suggests its the latter, and has prompted a pivotal Congressional investigation. On Friday, the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee initiated an investigation of the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to determine | Read More »

    The White House Lied About Broadband in Cedar Falls

    From the diaries… The President’s claim that Cedar Fall residents can get a gig for less than many Americans pay for premium cable is untrue. His statement that the Cedar Falls Utility network is 100 times faster than the average American Internet connection is, at best, a misleading and contradictory exaggeration, and at worst, absolutely false. Last week, President Obama said “were gonna change” — i.e., preempt through | Read More »

    Obama Plan to Regulate the Internet Promises More Economic Despair

    It’s no mystery why the Democratic Party lost big in this year’s election: “The party of economic despair will always lose.” President Obama has presided over six years of lackluster economic growth. “Progressive Democratic policies on Keystone, power-plant closures and oils exports crushed younger, unionized job seekers.” This week, the President doubled down on his bad economic policies when he announced his plan to impose | Read More »

    What Does the Shift Toward Online Video Streaming Mean for Regulatory Policy?

    A flurry of announcements that HBO, CBS, and Lionsgate and Tribeca Enterprises will stream video content online has prompted plenty of speculation about its potential success or impending failure. Some claim it proves that all consumers want to purchase video programming on an ‘à la carte’ basis. Others claim that HBO’s online service is “doomed before it even starts.” I’m inclined to side with Rep. Bobby Rush (D-IL) 13%, | Read More »

    New STELA Bill, Still Not Clean

    Recent news reports indicate that the Senate Commerce Committee has dropped the à la carte and Internet provisions in its STELA reauthorization bill (called STAVRA). But the bill is still not ‘clean’. It appears that the bill still contains a provision codifying the FCC’s decision to prohibit independent TV stations from jointly negotiating retransmission consent agreements. Like the FCC rule, this prohibition would apply in all TV markets, including | Read More »