SEARCH ALL ARTICLES BY philliesfan:
Philliesfan is a social scientist and writer who has worked as an analyst for the Department of Defense, served as a naval officer, and taught at the Naval War College.

RECENT ARTICLES

    Our Two Minute Hate

    Today our local Fox news broadcast (a typical liberal station, not FNC), provided another instance of the press’s noble struggle to defend helpless government against the predations of money-grubbing private citizens.  The station’s crusading reporter descended on a New Jersey dentist’s office and attacked him about a dental school loan he had defaulted on, but was paying back. He was on an online government list | Read More »

    Romney’s Vision Thing

    When George H.W. Bush ran for re-election, one of the problems he faced was a perceived inability to place his policy objectives into a larger, compelling framework that would capture voters’ imaginations. “The vision thing,” as he called it, would dog his campaign. While it was Ross Perot’s candidacy that cost Bush the election (take note, Donald Trump), since that time politicians have been careful | Read More »

    Give Me Liberty Or Get Me Rewrite!

    In the novel 1984, the protagonist, Winston Smith, works in the Records Department of the Ministry of Truth, or Minitrue. His job? Alter news articles to reflect current Party policy. Meanwhile, Smith’s illicit lover, Julia, works in Minitrue’s Fiction Department, working on a novel writing machine, helping to churn out fiction supporting the Party line. Any fact, any sentence, any historical reference that might threaten | Read More »

    The Green Inquisitors

    Students, faculty, and staff at a northeastern liberal arts college recently received an email that announced that a printing quota was being imposed in order to reduce the use of paper. The email stated that this “green initiative” was being undertaken in the interest of “raising consciousness” about the environment—and, of course, save money. Among the “printing facts” was the somber note that “400 trees” | Read More »