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The “Options Plan”

As we continue on with the debt ceiling battle, we seem to have abandoned “Cut, Cap and Balance” for either Boehner’s plan (another useless debt commission), Reid’s plan (accounting gimmicks) or Obama’s plan (blame Bush and keep saying the words “balanced approach” until he fools people into thinking he has a plan).

Well, I’d like to offer a new plan.  Let’s call it the “Q’s Clues Options Plan”.  It goes like this:

Step 1 is already complete.  We’ve passed a debt ceiling increase in exchange for “Cut, Cap and Balance”.  The Senate doesn’t like it.  Big whoop.  So we’ll give them two more options.

Step 2 is simple.  Pass another bill that would put forth the exact same debt limit increase in exchange for a full repeal of Obamacare.  Of course, we know the Senate would crap on that, too, despite the fact that the American people are in favor of getting rid of that as well.

Step 3 is also simple.  Pass one more bill that would provide the same debt ceiling increase in exchange for a cap on expenditure increases of no more than 2% of the previous year through 2020.  In short, from 2012 until 2020, each department gets a straight 2% increase, and nothing more.  Spending can be rearranged if needed, but the total growth can only be 2 percent.

How will this help, you ask?  Well, using the FY 2011 budget analysis document’s (http://www.gpoaccess.gov/usbudget/fy11/pdf/budget.pdf) summary table on page 146, here’s what we’re looking at for budgets and increases from 2012 through 2010 (numbers in billions):

Outlays Increase % Receipts Difference
2012 3755 n/a n/a 2926 -829
2013 3915 160 4.09% 3188 -727
2014 4161 246 5.91% 3455 -706
2015 4386 225 5.13% 3634 -752
2016 4665 279 5.98% 3887 -778
2017 4872 207 4.25% 4094 -778
2018 5084 212 4.17% 4299 -785
2019 5415 331 6.11% 4507 -908
2020 5713 298 5.22% 4710 -1003

 

(I am choosing to start with FY 2012 as the base instead of FY 2011 because the document indicates that the FY 2012 outlays are actually less than the FY 2011 ones.  Frankly, I’m not sure I believe that, but that’s what it says, and one has to work with the data available.)

So let’s reduce those percentage increases to 2% and nothing more and leave everything else the same.  Here’s what we get:

Current New Proposed Reduction Receipts New Deficit
2012 3755 3755 0 2926 -829
2013 3915 3830.1 84.9 3188.0 -642.1
2014 4161 3906.7 254.3 3455.0 -451.7
2015 4386 3984.8 401.2 3634.0 -350.8
2016 4665 4064.5 600.5 3887.0 -177.5
2017 4872 4145.8 726.2 4094.0 -51.8
2018 5084 4228.7 855.3 4299.0 70.3
2019 5415 4313.3 1101.7 4507.0 193.7
2020 5713 4399.6 1313.4 4710.0 310.4

 

See, that’s not so hard.  We have a surplus by 2018, $5.3 trillion in total reductions over 10 years, and nothing actually gets truly “cut”, except in the minds of Democratic demagogues who are bad at math.

So we pass those three bills and leave it at that.  Those are the options for the Senate and President.  We already know the first two are supported by the majority of Americans, and one would expect that the third would also be widely supported given that it balances the budget without truly cutting anything.  The Republicans look reasonable by offering flexibility with three perfectly good options that the American people support, and if Obama and Reid want to reject all three, then they look like even bigger fools than they do now.

That’s my plan.

 

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