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Some Thoughts on Taxes

An ongoing topic regarding the Obama administration is the obvious and upcoming increase in taxes to the middle class…. despite Obama’s campaign promises to the contrary.  Taxes are, after all, the primary way government acquires the revenues it spends, and this administration has completely blown away all previous spending records.  Since the money wasn’t sitting in an account waiting to be spent, Obama and Congress had to borrow it …ultimately against future taxes.  After only ten months of existence, this administration now owes more money than all previous administrations in our entire history have spent collectively.

Whether or not any entity has even the right to tax, and if so, to what degree it has the right to tax, and whether or not it has the right to tax future generations (who will obviously have no say in its current distribution) is a legitimate question.

Despotisms claim the right to tax and impose it by force. Democracies may also impose a tax by use of force, but in theory it is limited to enforcing tax laws that are agreed-to jointly by the body politic.

Presumably, the concept of fairness comes into play, as only a tax deemed fair would be agreed-to by the taxed. Also, when a tax is considered for imposition, it is not only the method and criteria that are considered, but the use of the proceeds as well. Democratic government does not have free reign to spend tax receipts in just any fashion deemed desirous by those holding office at the time the receipts are garnered or borrowed against. There are limits imposed by law, custom, tradition, and morality.

The same principle applies, though one step removed from the voting public in a representative republic. The tax and its use must in essence be agreed-to by the body politic. Taxes, in representative governments therefore, are generally approved for a common good, cumulative necessity, and to advance a national interest.

In a redistributive scenario, a portion of the taxes obtained are being used not for a common good, or cumulative necessity, or to advance a national interest, but rather to enrich one group or special interest at the expense of another. Where those being taxed don’t, on the whole, agree, the redistribution is tantamount to theft, plain and simple, and the government practices despotism in enforcing it. Governmental theft is still theft, and the fact that it is being carried out by the government doesn’t mitigate its moral or ethical vaccuousnes….. It enhances it.

All of this presumes that some entity has a right to tax at all. Despotisms claim the right to tax and impose it by force. Democracies may also impose a tax by use of force, but in theory it is limited to enforcing tax laws that are agreed-to jointly by the body politic.

Presumably, the concept of fairness comes into play, as only a tax deemed fair would be agreed-to by the taxed. Also, when a tax is considered for imposition, it is not only the method and criteria that are considered, but the use of the proceeds as well. Democratic government does not have free reign to spend tax receipts in just any fashion deemed desirous by those holding office at the time the receipts are garnered or borrowed against. There are limits imposed by law, custom, tradition, and morality.

The same principle applies, though one step removed from the voting public in a representative republic. The tax and its use must in essence be agreed-to by the body politic. Taxes, in representative governments therefore, are generally approved for a common good, cumulative necessity, and to advance a national interest.

In a redistributive scenario, a portion of the taxes obtained are being used not for a common good, or cumulative necessity, or to advance a national interest, but rather to enrich one group or special interest at the expense of another. Where those being taxed don’t, on the whole, agree, the redistribution is tantamount to theft, plain and simple, and the government practices despotism in enforcing it. Governmental theft is still theft, and the fact that it is being carried out by the government doesn’t mitigate its moral or ethical vaccuousness…. It enhances it.

Add to that fact, that when a future generation is taxed, especially for monies that are being spent today, it is clearly for them taxation without representation, a basic tenet of the cause for revolt that launched this country in the first place.  It was so, because in essence taxation without representation is is the theft of personal property, which when sufficiently great (and it quickly becomes so) is the theft of a person’s life, efforts, desires, aspirations, beauty, potential for greatness….. in short… their freedom.

When we allow that to occur, we are condemning our progeny to a life of despotism unless they are able to throw of the shackles that WE have placed on them through our recalcitrance in controlling our elected officials.  And throwing off shackles only gets harder over time as they are allowed to exist.  I fear our grandchildren may one day curse our names.

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