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Everytime there is an outbreak of Islamic violence directed against the West, the media sets up a full-court press on "islamophobia." This apparently happens anytime anyone says, "hey, maybe the underlying cause of Islamic violence and radicalism is, well, Islam." Several bizarre cases of that have come to light recently. After the San Bernardino shootings, Attorney General Loretta Lynch was more concerned about non-existent anti-Muslim "backlash" than about an investigation that might have prevented the attack being shut down because it thought there were violent and radical Muslims waiting to attack. There is the frequently expressed opinion that the slaughtered staff at the French magazine, Charlie Hebdo, had it coming for mocking Islam. Pam Geller was accused of being to blame for a terrorist assault on her "draw Mohammed" art showing as though killing people who offended you was acceptable and foreseeable. Now, in the aftermath of a widespread campaign of rape and sexual assault by Muslim men directed against European women over the Christmas and New Years holidays, the editorial board of the New York Times says our concern should be about the rapists not the victims and we should view it as a pleasant challenge:

A broader challenge is how to acculturate large numbers of mostly young, Muslim men to the sexual and gender norms of Europe. Norway has embarked on a nationwide program to help arriving men understand — and respect — European norms. That program should be an inspiration for Germany and other countries.

But these men must not be stigmatized. As Federica Mogherini, the European Union’s representative for foreign affairs and security policy, rightly observed, “Unfortunately violence against women is something that existed before the events that we faced on Dec. 31.”

Anti-Muslim backlash is actually a nasty myth and the fact is that Jews are far more likely to be targeted for violence in the US and in Europe than are Muslims.

But there is actually a religion under attack. Christianity. The non-profit World Watch Monitor documents religious persecution of Christians, this is what they have to report.

Persecution of Christians is more than just physical violence. It’s a complex, multifaceted phenomenon that involves many aspects, such as various forms of cultural marginalisation, government discrimination, hindrances on conversion, hindrances on participation in public affairs and restrictions on church life.

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It is a challenge to document violent incidents targeting Christians, especially in countries where access to information is restricted, or media reporting is insufficient. This table is based on research by the World Watch List team, assistance by Open Doors’ networks in the field, and help from external experts.

The 12-month reporting period ending 31 Oct., 2015 shows an overall increase in the numbers of Christians killed for faith-related reasons and churches attacked, in comparison to last year. The 2015 World Watch List reported 4,344 Christians killed for faith-related reasons and 1,062 churches attacked. The 2016 list documents 7,106 killed and 2,425 churches attacked.

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Compare and contrast this with the numbers of mosques closed or sacked in the US and Western Europe. Search and try to find evidence of anti-Muslim pogroms. Yet our media are consumed with an imaginary problem while a real tragedy is unfolding in front of their faces and yet they cannot see it. One wonders why that might be?