SEARCH ALL ARTICLES BY Dan McLaughlin:
<a href="http://baseballcrank.com/archives2/2004/11/blog_who_am_i_w.php"

RECENT ARTICLES

    Reflections on the American Revolution: The Generals

    Reflections on the American Revolution: The Generals

    How did America win its independence? In Part I of this essay, I looked at the population trends, foreign alliances, and equipment and weather conditions under which the American Revolution was fought. Let’s add some thoughts on the leaders of the principal combatants: the American and British generals. The American command was far from perfect – but the war could have turned out very differently | Read More »

    Reflections on the American Revolution (Part I of II)

    Reflections on the American Revolution (Part I of II)

    I’ve recently been reading a fair amount on the American Revolution, especially David McCullough’s 1776 (which should be required reading for every American).* The more you read of the Revolutionary War, the more there is to learn, especially about the vital question of how the colonists pulled off their victory over the vastly wealthier and more powerful Great Britain. The standard narrative of the American | Read More »

    Harry Reid’s Priorities: Immigration, Not Assault Weapons

    Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid gives some revealing insight into how he sees the Senate’s priorities this spring – priorities, in line with his support back home in Nevada, that are long on addressing immigration and not so high on banning “assault weapons”: Calling for a “cautious” approach to gun control, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid downplayed the chances of the Senate renewing an assault-weapons | Read More »

    More Cigarette Taxes Equals More Cigarette Smuggling

    More Cigarette Taxes Equals More Cigarette Smuggling

    A recent study from the Tax Foundation and the Mackinac Center for Public Policy looking at cigarette taxes and cigarette smuggling reminds us, yet again, of how big government always ends up legislating the Law of Unintended Consequences. Tax That Smoker Behind The Tree You have to tax something to fund government, and if you’re taxing sales, cigarettes are as good a target as any: | Read More »

    Silver Linings in the Fiscal Cliff Deal

    Silver Linings in the Fiscal Cliff Deal

    I will not try to convince any conservative that the final fiscal cliff deal that passed the Senate with only a few dissenting votes and needed Democratic votes to pass the House with a divided GOP caucus is a good deal, nor that it is the best deal available under the circumstances. It is, however, important to remember that this was a deal negotiated under | Read More »

    Gun Control, Gun Rights, Gun Politics and Newtown: Part I of II

    The school shooting atrocity in Newtown, Connecticut has, predictably, touched off another round of the perennial gun-control debate. Especially for parents of young children (my youngest is the same age as most of the victims), the horror of the shootings is almost beyond description, and tends to make rational discussion impossible. And also unseemly, as Jonah Goldberg has explained. More to the point, this is | Read More »

    Republicans: Don’t Get Outbid On Taxes

    Republicans: Don't Get Outbid On Taxes

    Unlike some of my RedState colleagues, for reasons I explained on Tuesday, I agree with the basic theory behind John Boehner’s Plan B solution to the tax side of the fiscal cliff standoff: rather than trading Republican blessings on tax hikes for illusory “spending cuts,” let Democrats get the tax hikes they want with no pretense that Republicans support them, pass a bill making permanent | Read More »

    Republicans Must Retreat, Not Surrender, on the Fiscal Cliff

    Republicans Must Retreat, Not Surrender, on the Fiscal Cliff

    It’s time for John Boehner and the House and Senate Republicans now engaged in the fiscal cliff negotiations to learn a lesson from George Washington: when faced with fighting a losing battle, the wisest course is to retreat rather than surrender. Washington’s Retreats George Washington didn’t get to be the Father of His Country by leading his often outnumbered and outgunned troops on suicide missions. | Read More »

    Why You Can’t Trade Taxes For Spending

    Why You Can't Trade Taxes For Spending

    Should Republicans trade tax hikes for spending cuts? Much of the debate over the current fiscal cliff standoff centers around discussions of “ratios”: Republicans will agree to X dollars of tax hikes, Democrats will agree to Y dollars of spending cuts, and so forth. Much of this discussion is based on numbers that are misleading or worse, because Washington doesn’t calculate taxes and spending the | Read More »

    Sometimes, It Really Is Different This Time – A Polling Post-Mortem (Part III of III)

    Sometimes, It Really Is Different This Time - A Polling Post-Mortem (Part III of III)

    This is the third and final part of my three-part polling post-mortem. Part I here looks at the national and state polls, and Part II at the likely voter screens and the electorate. V. Polls vs. Non-Poll Tools One of my premises in reviewing projections of turnout was that other items of information besides the polls were worth reviewing. Many of these same indicators favoring | Read More »

    Sometimes, It Really Is Different This Time – A Polling Post-Mortem (Part II of III)

    Sometimes, It Really Is Different This Time - A Polling Post-Mortem (Part II of III)

    The second part of my 3-part post-mortem on the polls and the 2012 election. See yesterday’s Part I here. IV. Likely vs. Registered Voters A. Pay No Attention To The Man Behind The Screen Near the heart of every major polling controversy this year was the issue of sampling and likely-voter screens. Polls traditionally report results among either “all adults” (whether or not registered to | Read More »

    Sometimes, It Really Is Different This Time – A Polling Post-Mortem (Part I of III)

    Sometimes, It Really Is Different This Time - A Polling Post-Mortem (Part I of III)

    As promised, a mea culpa on my pre-election poll analysis: why I was wrong, why the state poll averages were right – and why I’d say most of the same things if I had to do it over. I suppose I have lost a good deal of credibility with a number of people by making the kind of out-on-a-limb prediction I don’t usually make, and | Read More »

    The Fall of the House of Romney

    Let’s not sugarcoat this: last night was a bitter loss for Republicans and conservatives, all the worse because the presidential race – like a number of the key Senate races – was eminently winnable, and down the stretch a great many of us believed we were going to win it. I’ll return (hopefully this week) to the poll-reading question of why that was wrong, after | Read More »

    Get Out The Vote

    Get Out The Vote

    Today is our day, the voters’ day. Here’s a little reminder from some Republicans you may remember about the importance of getting out the vote.

    My Final Election 2012 Predictions

    My Final Election 2012 Predictions

    It’s time to start making final predictions for the 2012 election. I’m also rounding up predictions from others who are out on the limb with me predicting a Romney victory. I still feel fairly confident about my bottom line: Romney will win. But until we see the actual voter turnout, it’s hard to project more than educated guesswork as to the size of that win. | Read More »