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    Three States Down, 47 To Go

    The basic dynamics of the 2012 GOP nomination battle remain unchanged: the bulk of the GOP electorate doesn’t want Mitt Romney, but isn’t really sold on an alternative. Iowa’s voters broke late to Rick Santorum as the conservative alternative; South Carolina’s broke late, and much more decisively, to Newt Gingrich. It remains up to Newt now to prove he can hold together the conservatives going | Read More »

    What The Republican “Establishment” Really Means

    There’s been a lot of talk, maybe too much talk, about the struggle between the GOP “Establishment” and “Outsiders,” sometimes – but sometimes not – meaning the Tea Party, however defined. There are many fault lines, wheels within wheels, that divide different groups on the Right, but it’s time to clarify the core issue that has people of perfectly conservative temperament and ideology scratching their | Read More »

    An Open Letter to Jim DeMint

    Dear Senator DeMint: By the numbers, we are yet very early in the presidential primaries. 1144 delegates are needed to sew up the nomination, and depending how you count these things, Mitt Romney has maybe 13 delegates after finishing Iowa in a de facto tie with Rick Santorum and thumping Ron Paul in New Hampshire last night. But presidential primary races are often about perception: | Read More »

    On Romney, Bain and Keeping Your Integrity

    We’re far down the rabbit hole of primary season right now, and that inevitably means that charges and counter-charges are flying so fast that the news cycle can change dramatically from morning to afternoon. Naturally, when things are moving this quickly and emotions are running high, people get carried away. This happens to everyone. A lot of people who sit on the sidelines are too | Read More »

    A Scurrilous Race-Baiting Attack on Newt Gingrich

    It’s silly season, I know. But that doesn’t mean we need to tolerate left-wing nonsense thrown at our candidates. If you’re familiar with his stump speech, Newt Gingrich routinely argues that Obama is a food stamp president and he’d be a paychecks president – that his economic plan would get more people to work so they wouldn’t be stuck relying on government aid. It’s one | Read More »

    The Conservative Race In Iowa

    There are 2,286 delegates awarded in the GOP primaries and caucuses; the nomination thus requires wrapping up 1,143 delegates. Between them, Iowa and New Hampshire award 10 delegates; South Carolina and Florida, the other two states voting later this month, award 75. By contrast, three states (California, Texas and New York) award a combined 422 delegates, more than a third of the total needed to | Read More »

    A Public Service Message From Rick Santorum

    Rick Santorum, GOP Senate leadership, 2004:

    Ron Paul’s Book Sounds A Lot Like His Newsletters

    CNN has the story about Ron Paul’s 1987 book, written at the time he was leaving Ronald Reagan’s Republican Party to run for president as a Libertarian and ” re-issued in 2007 during Paul’s last presidential bid with a cover photograph of an ominous SWAT Team”: Paul criticized people suffering from AIDS or other contagious diseases for demanding health insurance coverage. “The individual suffering from | Read More »

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    Don’t Settle: Rick Perry for President.

    Not a site endorsement; this is the view of the undersigned RedState Contributors. If this website has a purpose – if any conservative website or publication has a purpose – it must begin with electing conservatives to significant public offices. We have the chance to nominate a conservative for president and win the White House in 2012. We can fumble that chance away by settling | Read More »

    Taking Newt Gingrich’s Ideas Seriously

    Ideas don’t run for president; people do. That’s as true today as it was four years ago. So, it is understandable that much of the press and blog coverage of the 2012 GOP primary race has focused on the personalities, experience and record of the candidates rather than their ideas. In fact, until you know the candidates by their actions, you cannot meaningfully judge what | Read More »

    Election Day in Louisiana

    It’s Election Day today in Lousiana: [T]he electorate will settle increasingly nasty bouts for lieutenant governor, secretary of state and the state board of education. Local ballots are dotted with contested legislative matchups, a handful of judicial contests in New Orleans, and parish offices in Jefferson, Plaquemines, St. Bernard, St. Tammany, St. Charles and St. John the Baptist. Voters also must navigate a gaggle of | Read More »

    David Brooks Likes The Crease of Mitt Romney’s Pants

    I could hardly sum up more pithily the problem with Mitt Romney’s candidacy in four words than “David Brooks loves him.” Brooks’ column today is revealingly out of step with the party and the nation Romney is seeking to lead. Let’s start with what’s missing from Brooks’ description of the job Romney is applying for: [T]he challenges ahead are technically difficult. There’s a reason that | Read More »

    Reagan Did Not Wait Until The Last Minute

    The 2012 presidential election season has not been a normal one in many ways. History teaches us that every election season brings something new we haven’t seen before – but also that progress in electioneering, as in most walks of life, is more gradual than people are wont to predict. The candidate who says “this time, everything is different” or “the old rules don’t apply” | Read More »

    Job Creation and the Rich: The Facebook Story

    President Obama is on the prowl for new targets for (1) raising more tax revenue and/or (2) demonizing “the rich” for campaign purposes. Among Obama’s proposals, besides raising taxes on high-income individuals generally, is to more than double the tax rate paid by many private equity and venture capital investors from 15% to 35%, by reclassifying sales of their businesses (or shares in their businesses) | Read More »

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    Ten Years Later: Where I Was On September 11

    Until September 11, 2001, I worked in the World Trade Center, halfway up Tower One. I wasn’t doing political blogging at the time, but was writing “the Baseball Crank” as a weekly baseball column for the online edition of the Providence (R.I.) Journal. Here’s my account of that day, written for ProJo two days later while it was all still fresh. We run this every | Read More »