In December, the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey released a statement explaining an installment at the site of the 9/11 terrorist attacks:

In its continuing efforts to transform the World Trade Center site into a dynamic space in Lower Manhattan, the Port Authority announced that beginning today it will showcase famous candy sculptures around the World Trade Center campus crafted by renowned French artist Laurence Jenkell, Each of the sculptures features flags from countries in the G20 summit, and the art work was commissioned by companies and organizations including the Chanel Foundation, the International Olympic Committee and Coca-Cola.

Sound fine?

Not to some. One of those 20 countries is Saudi Arabia.

As a reminder: In 2003, the relatives of 850 victims of America’s greatest single instance of terror — along with 1500 who were hurt during the horror — sued Saudi Arabia, claiming the nation was responsible for supporting al-Qaeda. It provided four specific ways, and a U.S. District judge rejected the scorned Middle Eastern desert monarchy’s attempt last year to have the suit dismissed, ruling the plaintiffs had a “narrowly articulate basis” for their claims.

That’s Saudi Arabia.

On September 11, 2001, 19 hijackers killed nearly 3,000 Americans. 15 of the murderers were Saudi nationals.

The erected statue honoring the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia sports the country’s flag, along with this inscription:

“There is no god but Allah, and Mohammed is the prophet.”

According to The Observer, the statue is merely “a stone’s throw away from the 9/11 memorial.”

Not everyone is thrilled:

What are your thoughts on this? Please let us all know in the Comments section below.

-Alex

 

See 3 more pieces from me: a robber clobbered, a man playing football with women, and a man going to school with women.

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