Bearing Arms reports that Katie Couric’s is now facing some serious, and expensive legal trouble for her documentary “Under the Gun,” which falsely made a gun rights group in Virginia seem ignorant about the very cause they support. According to documents obtained by Bearing Arms, Couric is now being sued for millions.

The plaintiffs seek not less than $12 million in compensatory damages, $350,000 each in punitive damages, attorneys fees and costs, and an injunction against “disseminating, distributing, or publishing” any version of the film containing the plaintiffs.

According to the lawsuit, Couric and her directer, Stephanie Soechtig purposefully edited footage to not only make the gun rights advocacy group seem less intelligent than they were, but also manipulated lighting effects to make them seem more sinister. It even made used more soft, and ample lighting for the anti-gun advocates to make them seem more friendly and reasonable.

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From the lawsuit:

Second Amendment rights advocacy organization the Virginia Citizens Defense League (VCDL), along with two of its members, today filed a $12 million defamation lawsuit against Katie Couric, director Stephanie Soechtig, Atlas Films, and Studio 3 Partners LLC d/b/a Epix for false and defamatory footage featured in the 2016 documentary film Under the Gun. The film portrays a fictional exchange in which members of the VCDL appear silent, stumped, and avoiding eye contact for nearly nine seconds after Katie Couric asks a question about background checks. An unedited audio recording of the interview reveals that—contrary to the portrayal in the film—the VCDL members had immediately begun responding to Couric’s question.

In the filing, the VCDL, Daniel L. Hawes, Esq., and Patricia Webb allege that the filmmakers knowingly and maliciously manufactured the fictional exchange by splicing in footage that the filmmakers took surreptitiously after telling the interviewees to be silent for ten seconds so that recording equipment could be calibrated. The filing also contains side-by-side screenshots of the film’s footage of the VCDL members and anti-gun advocates, alleging that the filmmakers manipulated lighting to cast shadows on the VCDL members and to make them appear sinister and untrustworthy. “We were horrified to see how Couric and her team manipulated us and the video footage to make us look like fools who didn’t stand up for the Second Amendment,” said Mr. Philip Van Cleave, President of the VCDL. “We want to set the record straight and hold them accountable for what they’ve done. You shouldn’t intentionally misrepresent someone’s views just because you disagree with them.”

It should be noted that during the filming of this production, Soechtig is on record multiple times saying that she broke federal law attempting to prove a point about buying guns out of state. Whether or not Couric or Soechtig will face any legal troubles for this remains to be seen, but Owens of Bearing Arms doesn’t have too much confidence in that happening.

Realistically, I don’t expect Katie Couric, Stephanie Soechtig, or the Colorado-based producer who purchased the weapons to spend any significant time behind bars for their crimes.

U.S. Attorney for the District of Arizona John S. Leonardo should still bring felony charges against these apparent criminals, perhaps letting them off with parole if they agree to each plea to a single felony count.

Felony convictions would make these conspirators “prohibited persons” in the eyes of the law, ensuring they would never be able to purchase, trade, or possess firearms again for the rest of their lives.