A gun range in southern New Jersey’s Camden County is causing leftist’s heads to explode and call it “racist.” Why? Because it’s a clear swipe at the NFL kneelers.

The NFL kneelers have become ground zero for social justice advocacy, ranging from causes like police brutality against minorities to the debunked wage gap myth.

But instead of actually doing anything to improve their communities, NFL players choose to kneel during the national anthem, a clear sign of disrespect toward the country that amounts to little but a virtue signaling-fest that accomplishes nothing but falling ratings for the NFL.

It’s that disrespect that the South Jersey Shooting Club decided to one up with a pro-military billboard featuring a kneeling soldier with gun drawn, and the words “the only time we take a knee…”

The billboard was photographed by a woman named MoNeke Ragsdale, who urged people to call the manager and take the “racist” billboard down.

The Camden County chapter of the NAACP soon got involved. According to The Inquirer, the NAACP claims the “signs twist the message of kneeling, which is meant to bring attention to systemic racism and police brutality against people of color.”

“We’re talking about police murdering unarmed black people,” NAACP member Keith Benson Sr. said. He called the signs racially divisive and has encouraged people to call the club to complain. “They deserve all the disrespect they’re going to get as a result of putting it up. But they probably thought they were clever. They probably thought they were strong, patriotic Americans.”

“We’re living in a very difficult time right now,” said Susan Druckenbrod, a member of the South Jersey Women for Progressive Change, who also believes the billboard is racist. “People are trying to stand up for black and brown people to say, ‘Hey this is not right. That sign really is just mocking the idea of taking a knee.”

However, the owners of the billboard say this isn’t a racial issue, and it’s about respect for the military. The owner of the billboard ads, Wesley Aducat, says he has no intention of taking the billboards down, adding that while he agrees with people’s right to protest, he doesn’t believe it should happen during the national anthem.

Aducat is right to keep his billboards up. While so many are concerned that the sign is a show of disrespect toward minorities, no one seems to question whether or not the kneeling is a sign of disrespect toward those who gave their lives so the rich and famous can have the right to virtue signal.