A rule of thumb when it comes to social interaction is that if a person is vehemently accusing someone of doing something they’re innocent of, it’s because they themselves are guilty of the crime. It’s something one should always consider when listening to Democrats, social justice warriors, et al point their finger at Conservatives, Republicans, and Libertarians for being racist, sexist, bigoted, etc etc.

In terms of racism and sexism, the Republican party is far from being a racist and sexist institution. Not only do they hold true to the idea that all men are truly created equal, they vote by it, and their history proves this.

In a new video from Prager U, former Vanderbilt Professor of Political Science Carol Swain explains that when it came to promoting blacks and women, Republicans were on the forefront.

Meanwhile, Democrats were attempting to prevent Republican advancements every step of the way:

In 1870, the first black senator and the first black congressman were sworn in—both Republicans. In fact, every black representative in the House until 1935 was a Republican. And every black senator until 1979 was, too. For that matter, the first female member of Congress was a Republican; the first Hispanic governor and senator were Republicans. The first Asian senator? You get the idea.

Republicans also kept their pledge to defend women’s rights. In 1862, the Morrill Anti-Bigamy Act was passed by the Republican-controlled Congress to put an end to polygamy.

In 1920, after 52 years of Democratic Party opposition, the 19th Amendment was ratified thanks to the Republican Congress, which pressured Democratic President Woodrow Wilson to drop his opposition to women’s rights. In the final tally, only 59 percent of House Democrats and 41 percent of Senate Democrats supported women’s suffrage. That’s compared to 91 percent of House Republicans and 82 percent of Senate Republicans. There certainly was a “war on women”—and it was led by the Democratic Party.

When it comes to equality, it’s Republicans who are really driving the movement.