Ocasio-Cortez's Treatment of Bernie Sanders Proves SJWs Are Unreliable Friends

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., attends a House Oversight Committee hearing on high prescription drugs prices shortly after her private meeting with Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., on Capitol Hill in Washington, Friday, July 26, 2019. The high-profile freshman and the veteran Pelosi have been critical of one another recently. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

In a sane world, the endorsement of New York Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez would be a death blow to any campaign, but the Democrats have considered the young democratic socialist something of a hero to their party for some time. So much so that Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders sought out her support for his campaign, not only just in words but with appearances and speeches.

For a while, that’s exactly what he got as AOC appeared with him at rallies and even sat with him during interviews. The two seemed like a perfect fit for each other as both are social justice driven socialists with wild ideas that no one knows how to implement and pay for. Regardless, Ocasio-Cortez’s endorsement of Sanders was helping him in the polls.

Till one day, AOC just kind of disappeared. According to the Huffington Post, the New York socialist was suddenly distancing herself from Sanders, even turning down requests to appear at events. According to one witness, getting her to attend events was like “pulling teeth”:

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-N.Y.) turned down repeated requests from Bernie Sanders’ presidential campaign to appear at events promoting the Vermont senator’s candidacy in recent weeks, according to three people familiar with the discussions.

After the Iowa caucuses, Sanders campaign manager Faiz Shakir asked Ocasio-Cortez to stump for Sanders in New Hampshire, according to the sources. The campaign prepared a model schedule to highlight the kind of popular support she would expect if she attended, one of the people familiar with the talks said.

Ocasio-Cortez resisted the entreaties until a few days before the primary on Feb. 12. She ultimately spoke the day before the election at a Sanders rally in Durham, New Hampshire, where the rock band The Strokes performed.

“It was like pulling teeth to get her to New Hampshire,” said a second person who knew about the discussions.

What happened? According to HuffPo, Sanders isn’t woke enough for AOC:

As Vanity Fair first reported in February, Shakir apparently communicated to Ocasio-Cortez his dissatisfaction over her remarks about alerting the presence of immigration authorities. While Sanders has sought to scrap and restructure the Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency in its current form, his campaign has been trying to avoid the impression that it was encouraging noncooperation with federal law as it exists, according to one source. (The Sanders campaign denied on Friday that Shakir ever spoke to Ocasio-Cortez about her immigration remarks.)

After that, Ocasio-Cortez ― already annoyed with the campaign’s Jan. 23 decision to publicize the endorsement of controversial podcast host Joe Rogan ― grew less interested in helping Sanders’ campaign, according to the source. After her last event in Iowa on Jan. 26, she did not return to the trail for Sanders until 16 days later, at the New Hampshire rally featuring The Strokes.

It’s not yet clear if the sudden absence of AOC from the Sanders campaign is what wrecked his momentum. It probably didn’t help, but none of that really matters. The lesson here is one that many have learned for years.

Sanders has put his faith in the wrong people this entire election cycle. His primary goal was to charge up the youth enough to carry him through the primary and well into the general. The only problem is that youth voters are notoriously unreliable when it comes time to pull the lever. They typically don’t show up to the polls at all.

(READ: More Trouble for Dems as Coveted Youth Voters Not Voting)

Sanders also put his trust in the social justice crowd to help him, but just like the youth vote, the unreliability of the social justice warrior is unprecedented. They may be your friend one day, but the next you’ll be digging knives out of your back after you did something you thought was innocuous.

When it comes to the social justice warrior, they will profess to be about others. Every virtue they signal and outrage they voice is always in defense for this or that group. They’re always fighting for someone or something according to them.

Sanders is the closest the socialists have ever gotten to taking over the country. He cares about a lot of the same things the social justice warriors do, and even if he falls short in some regards, the fact that someone like Sanders aligns so much with them should put them squarely in his camp.

However, a social justice warrior isn’t out for others. They aren’t fighting for anyone or anything. In reality, they’re just out for themselves. AOC is no different.

AOC has a lot to gain for her movement by making sure Sanders crosses the finish line first. Every desire she’s ever had for her social justice future would have doors opening left and right as Sanders implemented one socialist policy after another.

The problem is that Sanders stepped out of her approved line just a little and this, as it does with any SJW, offended her sensibilities so much that she’s willing to let him flounder on the national stage in an election year where they have a professed enemy too great to let win. If AOC truly cared, do you think she would let a few disagreements get in the way of something so big as all of this?

Here we see the true face of the SJW. There are no loyalties or foresight. There is no forgiveness and there’s definitely no friendships. To the SJW, you are either convenience or an enemy. There is no in-between.

Let this be yet another example to the public, or even those in the mainstream media who embrace the social justice warrior. Every SJW is a beast that demands to be appeased, but rest assured, at some point you will be eaten.

Brandon Morse
Senior Editor. Culture critic, and video creator. Good at bad photoshops.
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