Good grief. The things people get paid for …

A number of Twitter warriors on the Left have taken it upon themselves to shake the political convictions of conservative Christians by gaslighting their faith. One popular meme lately reframes the story of the nativity as a Tiajuana-to-Texas analog. Because then Bad Orange Man = Herod the Baby Killer.

I have yet to meet anyone whose mind has been changed by this bit of willful historical illiteracy. But that hasn’t stopped eminent Near-Middle-East historians such as Mark Ruffalo and Pete Buttigieg from giving it the ol’ Hollywood try:

As Matt Walsh points out … they’re flat out wrong:

But arguing over historical technicalities misses the point, too, and falls into the Left’s strategy. Saying that Ruffalo and Buttigieg are “wrong” presupposes they are trying to be *right* in any way sane people might recognize. They are not.

They just want to confuse and guilt-trip enough lightly-informed Christians to shift political power and turf out the Orange Menace, then hammer the United States into the shape it’s *supposed* to possess.

This is Marxism and Saul Alinsky in a nutshell: confuse the opposition to weaken them, so that worldwide socialism can start its predestined reign over us all. Then right and wrong won’t matter, because everything will be glorious. President Buttigieg will do what’s needed–which in this case is to abolish border security and import enough voting foreign nationals to make conservatism extinct.

A more appropriate response might be: “Y’all are dumb, and nobody cares. Sell crazy someplace else.” Who needs theological tutoring from The Hulk or Alfred E. Neuman?

I’ve said it before, and I’ll say it again: the Left LOVES to argue over the meaning of commonplace words. The Revolution doesn’t start with rifles. It starts with convincing people words do not mean what they mean. After the “reactionaries” can no longer communicate, then you bring out the rifles and get down to the business of REAL change.

A textbook example of word-wrangling presents itself in a bit of opinion from Tyler Huckabee at the hilariously-named Relevant. Huckabee argues with great passion that even though Jesus was in no sense a refugee, he really was. I encourage you to read it. I felt like I’d dropped acid, without the hangover.

To Tyler, Pete, and Mark, I can only say: I don’t care. Quibbling over the meaning of words like “refugee” and “illegal immigrant” is a grade-school game.

The crux of the matter is the same as it ever was. The United States has laws about how people may come and go across our borders, and we have them for good reasons. We must follow the laws until we change them by lawful means. The Son of Man was crystal-clear that respect for law was non-negotiable; that neither faith, charity, nor disagreement with the law excuses lawlessness.