Ever since California entered the Union as a state in 1850, there have been more than 200 formal petitions for the state to leave the Union and strike it out on their own.  That is more than 1 petition per year, on average, which beats any sentiments in the former Confederacy.

Leaving aside the legality or constitutionality of California seceding from the United States, the country as a whole would lose about $2 trillion in GDP.  If California were its own country, it would- assuming every business stayed there- be the 9th richest country in the world beaten only by the likes of the remaining 49 states, China, Japan, Germany, England, India, France, and Brazil.  Not a bad start for a new country.  Of course, as stated above, that is based on a lot of assumptions not least of which is whether any business based in California would remain there.  Incidentally, without California, the US would remain the richest country by a long shot over China.

The US Treasury would lose out on $406 billion in tax revenue that would have to be made up for somewhere.  That is what Californians paid into the Treasury in fiscal year 2015.  Of course, the US would not be putting out $350 billion back into California, so the real loss to the Treasury would be about $56 billion.  But, we would no longer have to worry about the 30 military installations in California, or the 35 national parks and monuments in the state.  Sure, the United States would lose some majestic scenery in the deal, but there is more than enough majestic scenery in the remaining 49 states to make up for what is lost in California without obtaining a passport.

Politically, the country would probably be much better off especially since every non-conservative Californian believes the remainder of the country is composed of inbred retards.  Since the House is set at 435 members by law, we can adjust for that OR leave it alone.  This assumes no Californians would get out before secession.  This also means that there are 55 less electoral votes going to a Democrat every four years with those votes most likely ending up in places like Texas, Arizona, Florida and other states with growing population (which happen to be red states).

Of course, that means that the halls of Congress would no longer be haunted by the likes of Maxine Waters, Adam Schiff and Nancy Pelosi, but there are enough whack cases remaining to make up for their loss.

Economically, milk prices might go up in the remaining states, as would the price of almonds.  But then again, as with politics, the remaining states would likely pick up the slack and no one would be wanting for milk…or almonds.  However, water rights would have to be negotiated with the new country and that could put a damper on the California agricultural sector.  My guess is that most high tech firms would head for more friendly areas like Texas or Georgia, but they would be best advised to leave their politics in California before doing so.

Socially and culturally, the remaining states would look like…well, the United States.  For example, California recently downgraded infecting someone with AIDS/HIV from a felony to a misdemeanor.  Most Americans disagree with that policy.  California recently voted to designate themselves a sanctuary state.  Most Americans disagree with that policy.  Some California school districts have banned wearing the American flag.  Most Americans disagree with that policy.

In fact, the United States Supreme Court would likely be a less busy place given the number of cases that reach that Court from the Ninth Circuit- most of them emanating from District Courts in California.  That Ninth Circuit which sits in San Francisco is the most liberal and the one with the worst record before the Supreme Court.

The latest movement to secede is nothing short of a statewide fit over the election of Donald Trump who, if California was gone, would have beaten Hillary by 1.5 million votes in an electoral landslide.  Under the guises of “Caleavifornia,” and other cute names, the latest proposal gaining traction is “Yes, California” which seeks to put the issue to voters come 2021.  Whatever they decide, let President Whoever in 2021 let them go their peaceful way.

Naturally, such a referendum simply expresses a feeling of those who vote and has no chance of ever becoming reality.  There is a greater chance that the state would be subdivided into more states than there is of secession, which is to say neither is happening.

Since the flag of California already has a red star on it, they are well on their way to having a national flag already!  Most likely, the red bar at the bottom will convert to a rainbow although it is highly suggested they remove the bear.

The new People’s Republic of California can even take some territories with them- the Portland, Oregon area and Seattle, Washington area leaving the remainder of those states to the existing US.  They can even make Spanish their official co-language with English.

And the US Treasury can partially make up for the loss in revenue from California with a heavy tax and tariff on the offerings from Hollywood.  This writer sees no downside with California exiting the Union EXCEPT removing one star from the American flag which would be an economic boon for flag makers everywhere.  Whether secession is legal and constitutional or not, an act of Congress can and should grant them their desires.  Let’s not make San Diego Fort Sumter, circa 1861.  One hundred sixty years after that fateful day, let’s allow an amicable and friendly split.  When the inevitable earthquake, wildfire or mudslide strikes, the inbred retards that remain in the United States will likely be there with charitable donations, thoughts and prayers.