Since the founding of our Republic, conspiracy theories have been a part of American political discourse.  They are as American as mom, hot dogs and apple pie.  Likewise, the term has been used to discredit anyone pointing out collusion between powerful people or entities.  According to the mainstream media, conspiracy theories are divisive, dangerous and evil.  Former Obama administration official Cass Sunstein wrote that conspiracy theories cause “violence, including terrorism.”

From an academic perspective, the experts tell us that conspiracy theories are a way for “ignorant” people to make sense of the world.  One such academic exercise tells us that conspiracy theories are an evolutionary holdover from our caveman past where suspicion helped man survive.  Then, everyone was a potential enemy.  Most recently, conspiracy theory has been used to describe a mechanism for white people dealing with domestic demographic change.

Conspiracy theories are everywhere these days.  They are almost impossible to ignore.  Recently, academia has revived the phrase “conspiracism.”  This was first used in the 1980s to describe conspiracy theories in politics as a form of mass psychosis.  Well, at least they are not accusing anyone of being racist cavemen that much these days.  However, just as academia has overplayed the accusation of “racism,” so too shall they overplay the term “conspiracy theory.”

As bad as academia is with their invented words, the media is even worse.  CNN’s Jim Acosta called it “conspiracy theory” that President Trump (and others) had professed a belief in meddling in the 2016 election on the part of Ukraine.  When President Trump claimed that Google and other media outlets were suppressing conservative news sources, CNN’s Chris Cillizza cried “conspiracy theory.”

These are but two examples of legitimate gripes being labeled “conspiracy theory” to discredit them, or the speaker.  Much of the recent impeachment nonsense centers around Trumps “false beliefs” about Ukrainian influence in the 2016 election.  In virtually every deposition released so far, the witnesses of Schiff’s parade of clowns note that the Ukrainian influence story has been refuted, that Russia is wholly responsible, that it has been addressed, that it is a dead issue, that it is, in short, a conspiracy theory.  The only problem is that since late 2016/early 2017, Ukrainian attempts to influence the outcome of the 2016 election these stories have been documented.  One story in Politico is indicative.  An article titled “Ukrainian Efforts to Sabotage Trump Backfire” show clearly Trump’s concerns in 2019 are very real.  They are not “conspiracy theory.”

Likewise, real whistleblowers at Google and other sites have confirmed that the suppression of conservative voices is a very real thing.  Project Veritas recently revealed that an ABC reporter was shut down in her reporting of pedophile Jeffrey Epstein.  If a media apparatus cannot fool the people on its own payroll, they are in sadder shape than we thought.

A recent poll by the Columbia University School of Journalism is quite enlightening.  They report that American confidence in the press is at all-time lows.  Unless you are a Democrat, you have a high lack of confidence in the press.  And there is a good reason for a Democrat’s relatively higher levels of confidence in the press: they parrot the talking points of Democrats.

Nowhere is this seen more clearly than in the unhinged belief in a theory that Russia was responsible for Trump’s victory over Clinton in 2016.  In fact, Russia- a country on economic life support with an aging military infrastructure and perhaps the weakest it has ever been- is blamed for virtually everything with which the “experts” and academics dislike.  That could include the election of a populist Italian government or the Brexit vote in England.

Instead, these “Russia is behind everything” news stories are passed off as real news.  If Russia is behind all the political discord and swaying so many votes in so many countries, perhaps the United States could learn something from them.  After all, they are doing a better job of not only determining favorable electoral outcomes, they seem to be good at covering their tracks.  Yet, for three years through innumerable bombshells and the constant drumbeat of “Robert Mueller,” what are we left with?  Answer: nothing but a real conspiracy theory that distracted the Trump Administration for more than two years.

Thus it becomes apparent that powerful Democrats and their willing allies in the intelligence community and media do not want us cavemen probing their misdeeds.  Their problem is that their representation of “the facts” make little sense.  Is it any wonder, then, that they have a crisis of credibility?

Articles in such publications as The Economist, Washington Post, Business Insider and others continue the drumbeat of conspiracy theory to shame people away from asking uncomfortable questions.  While simultaneously pushing a nonsensical narrative (Russia swayed the 2016 election, Trump discussed a quid pro quo on a phone call, Trump is enriching himself in violation of the Emoluments Clause, etc.), they attempt to shame away alternative and more realistic narratives.  Their problem is that their narratives make little sense and are full of holes.  Meanwhile, there is very real evidence from a variety of sources that Ukraine, in fact, did meddle in the 2016 election.

Perhaps if the media portrayed the news and presented facts without bias and so-called “in-depth” analysis 24/7 with panels of pundits we all should be thankful are no longer in government, there would not be a search for alternative facts and accusations of conspiracy theories.

Unless mainstream media (and the Democrats in Congress) do not clean up their act, believability on the part of the public will continue to decline.  This writer hopes they continue to beclown themselves and show once and for all what fools they really are.  If you want to stop so-called conspiracy theories and expunge them from political discourse, perhaps they should stop pushing conspiracy theories in the name of harassing, hounding and “impeaching” a duly-elected President.