Roll Call reports the Democrats intend to bring up immigration next year as a big fight leading into the 2010 elections. Their approach will be predictable — support extended family immigration, amnesty for all illegals, and no input from the GOP.Lindsey Graham is no doubt beside himself with delight over this one.This got me thinking though. The GOP is said to be absolutely opposed to immigration in all cases — some of you might like that, but it does not sell with the general voter. First, it is politically an untenable position. Second, very few of us are really opposed to all immigration. Being a second generation American, I cannot see myself being in favor of sealing up the borders in all cases whatsoever.However, it seems a Democrat plan to allow full amnesty and extended family immigration will be politically unpopular not just with middle class white voters, but with a great deal of immigrants, Hispanic and otherwise, many of whom are having a hard enough time finding work without competing with a new influx of job seekers. I think the GOP has the ability to beat the Democrats at their own game on immigration next year if done right.I can’t say this is an original idea. Michael Barone mentioned it to me at dinner the other night and I think he is on to something.In 2009, Asian American voters went overwhelmingly for Republicans across the board. The Asian American community is a statistically significant voter pool that is ripe for coalition building. Barone suggested, and I agree, that the stance the GOP should take on immigration, particularly in this economic situation, is to oppose extended family immigration, which even divides the Hispanic immigrant community, and vigorously support “job creator immigration.”That keeps the GOP on the side of small government, decreased welfare rolls, and the entrepreneur.We know the United States is falling behind competitively in high tech sectors because unions are blocking high skilled immigration into the United States. We also know that Asian Americans are extremely entrepreneurial and vastly more often than not create new jobs in the American economy instead of filling up jobs existing citizens might want. Likewise, Asian Americans are least likely to engage in extended family immigration that moves onto state subsistence.The prospect of supporting “job creator immigration” is something we shouldn’t dismiss out of hand. It means the GOP is not close minded on immigration, supports hard working immigrants, and can contrast the Democrats’ immigration plan, which would expand the need for state subsistence, to immigration done right, which would expand jobs in the economy and bring into the country an influx of smart, capable, ready to work citizens who actually want a full ownership stake in the American system.As an added benefit, the GOP gets to solidify ties to a growing and important voter bloc that more naturally fits the entrepreneurial spirit the GOP claims to represent.