President Trump announced that he plans to end the “diversity lottery” for immigration visas. The timing of the announcement coincided with yet another Muslim terrorist attack on Americans. Trump fingered Senator Chuck Schumer as one of the culprits who helped design the program, which NumbersUSA says randomly grants 50,000 green cards each year.

Strangely enough, though, those on the Left who defend the visa lottery were quick to point out that the bill was originally signed in 1990 by President George H.W. Bush. Apparently, the Left believes that opposition to the program can be quelled by pointing out that a “Republican” supported it. The New York Times recently suggested that Americans are more partisan than they are ideological, so this “appeal to party” was a nice try.

President Bush, however, wasn’t just another Republican. President Bush was one of the (fortunately very few) mistakes made by President Reagan. And word has it that President Reagan was basically forced into selecting Bush as his Vice President, as the two men reportedly didn’t care for one another. It took almost four decades, but the Republican Party owes President Trump its gratitude for finally wresting itself free from the grip of the Bush family.

Still, looking back on 1990, what could President Bush have been thinking? He came from a family with deep roots in America–he was the son of a Senator. He served honorably in World War Two as a naval pilot, and survived being shot down by the Japanese. What possesses someone of such a background to support something called a “diversity lottery?” Did 1990s America still look a little too much like the one Bush’s parents grew up in (those hopeless squares!) and spicing things up seemed like the answer? War in Yugoslavia, a state made up of a number of diverse folks, began just a year later. By 1993, the Czechs and Slovaks had split up, although in a peaceful manner, a sharp contrast to what was happening in the Balkans. One would think that with such contemporary examples that America might have been better served by a legal framework that strengthens unity.

Ultimately, the works wrought by humans can also be undone by humans, provided there exists sufficient political will. President Trump appears to be correcting the mistakes made in 1990 in the visa system. Can we count on a Republican-controlled Congress to support the President’s efforts to regain control of our borders and strengthen our internal security?