Donald Trump was right. The open southern border is a problem. There is absolutely no way to prevent violent criminals from entering our country.

However, if we put aside his border advocacy and general anti-PC style, is he still someone that conservatives should support for president?

That question comes down to trust. Can we trust Donald Trump?

Consider his history: Trump flirted with presidential bids in 1988, 2000, 2004, 2008, and 2012. During that span of time, he held a different political positions (mostly liberal) that we will get into later.

The point is, Trump has long had his eye on the presidency. He has always been a vain, arrogant man, which is something his supporters seem to acknowledge but dismiss at the same time. For Trump, it is “all about me.” More money for “me.” Fresh trophy wives for “me.” Again, his supporters recognize this but it does not seem to concern them.

And then when you look at Trump’s record of political positions, you see that he has been nothing like his Tea Party aligned supporters.

National Review put out a good piece summing up many of his problems. Go read it, but to summarize, Trump has been pro-choice, pro-universal healthcare, pro-taxing the 1%, pro-expanding eminent domain (and has personally benefited from it), and even today is against reforming entitlement programs (which threaten our solvency) and opposes free trade (in turn, supporting higher prices).

While that article covered a lot of the bases, it left out some other problems with Trump. He has supported an assault weapons ban. And relatively recently, he has supported a pathway to citizenship. And let’s not forget all of the money Trump has given to Hillary and other Democrats over the years. In 2008, Trump said this about Hillary: “I’m a big fan of Hillary. She’s a terrific woman. She’s a friend of mine.” He also praised Bill Clinton this year as the best president out of the last four.

It is also important to listen to the way Trump speaks. Notice that he never mentions Congress. This brings the “all about me” thing back into the fold.

Trump is going to slap tariffs on countries. Trump is going to build the border fence himself (conflict of interest, anyone?). Trump is “going to be the greatest jobs president God ever created.” Trump is going to “bring back the money” from China, a country that is “killing us.” Trump’s go to explanation? “Believe me.”

C’mon, folks. Trump is not going to do this stuff. He doesn’t have the authority to, and most of his promises are so vague and ignorant that they can’t even be rebutted. It is clear that he doesn’t understand the separation of powers, how jobs are created, and how markets work. He has no detailed policy plans, and being a loud bully is no substitution.

That is why I very much agree with Ron Paul’s recent analysis of Trump:

“And a lot of people find him sort of funny, and love him, even libertarian types,” Mr. Paul, who is now a registered Libertarian, lamented on Fox News Radio. “They like him because he’s so disruptive to the party system, and I enjoy that too. But I think he’s a man that if conditions deteriorate, which they can — see I work on the assumption that the world is no more stable than Greece, and if those conditions come, people want to be told what to do: ‘And I know what the answer is, and I’ll do this, and I am the man to this.’

“And [Mr. Trump] comes across this very well, and people listen to him, and I believe he may be raising white horses someplace and he’s going to ride in,” Mr. Paul continued. “Because he is almost the opposite of a Libertarian, because it’s not like ‘I want to give you your freedom and your liberty to run your life as you choose. Your civil liberties are absolutely yours, you can’t hurt anybody, it’s your own money you can spend it any way you want.’ But he sounds like the person, ‘I know the answers and I’m going to do this and I’ve done this, I’ve done this, this and this.’”

“An authoritarian?” Fox’s Alan Colmes asked. “He’s an authoritarian and that’s the way he claims he made all his money. So I see that as dangerous,” Mr. Paul responded.

In a sense, Trump is the new Obama and his supporters are the new Obama voters. Nobody cares about his past. Everyone is enamored by his speaking ability. People want to trust him, in the hope that we will bring about change. People are willing to ignore details like policy in favor of personality.

I really hope that those supporting Trump wake up. Because he has developed a cult of personality, he is not going to fade like the anti-Romney candidates in 2012 did. This is very disconcerting, because Trump may prevent a serious challenge to Jeb Bush. Right now, it appears [mc_name name=’Sen. Ted Cruz (R-TX)’ chamber=’senate’ mcid=’C001098′ ] is suffering the most from Trump’s insurgent campaign, but he could block the other candidates as well. Of course, if somehow Trump ever got the nomination, he would lose dramatically. Recent polling shows him 19 points behind Hillary.

As I have said before, no serious conservative, libertarian, or constitutionalist can support Donald Trump.