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Promoted from the diaries by streiff. Promotion does not imply endorsement.
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Referring to yet another #ClimateChange statement, William Teach of The Pirate’s Coves wrote:

And they want to take all power away from sovereign nations and place it in the hands of unelected bureaucrats in the U.N.

Since the people to whom Mr Teach referred happen to be those unelected bureaucrats in the UN, of course that’s what they want!

The various Star Trek shows might not be really intense science fiction, but like so many of the images of the future, they have us with a single world government,¹ but such a thing is simply glossed over, as some form of unquestionable good. In reality, a single world government is much more likely to be a despotism of some form.

We can see it already, in the European Union: Americans see the idea as noble and good, but are uneducated concerning the real differences in European people. They have a multitude of languages and, unlike the US, have the various ethnicities geographically restricted; Frenchmen are Frenchmen first, not Europeans first.

Several ethnic groups were forced to live together in the former Yugoslavia, but that nation was held together by Marshall Tito. When he went to his eternal reward, his successors tried to hold together that unnatural polyglot of peoples, and failed; it took only a couple of goons who thought they could take more power by inflaming ethnic differences, and while it cost them in the end, it demonstrated how easily those ethnic tensions could be inflamed. Yugoslavia is now gone, replaced by several ethnically based countries.

Many Scots want to separate from the United Kingdom, the Basques want to separate from Spain, the Chechnyans want independence from Russia, the Kurds want a nation independent from Syria, Iraq and Turkey, the ‘Palestinian’ Arabs want to push the Israelis into the sea, and the list goes on and on. After decades of peaceful coexistence in Czechoslovakia, when the opportunity arose to split into the Czech Republic and Slovakia arose, that’s what happened. Many Francophone Quebecois want to separate from Anglophone Canada, even though our neighbor to the north has both French and English as the official language. In the United Kingdom, Her Majesty’s subjects voted to leave the European Union, in large part due to the heavy-handed EU bureaucracy and rules. The Brits seemed to want to govern themselves, and not be bound by the edicts of Führerin und Reichskanzlerin Angela Merkel. Maybe we ought to consider that people really don’t want ‘diversity,’ don’t want to be ruled by people different from themselves.

Heck, it seems about the only place that wants to stay with its government is that Northern Ireland, dominated by Protestants, want to stay in the United Kingdom rather than be integrated into the Catholic Republic of Ireland.

The United Nations have become over full of themselves, with many seeing themselves as the precursor to a one world government, but the UN is a terrible place from which to begin such an idea. It is wracked by infighting, with alliances between dictators and Islamic states fighting against those nations which have a Western civilization.

And that is the real crux of the matter: the visions of a one world government are the visions of people with a Western civilization frame of mind. The vast majority of Muslims want no such thing, seeing those who are not Muslim as infidels, from whom they must be separated. Much of Africa and Asia have a history of colonialism, of being subject to the mastery of European powers, and have absolutely no desire to have even the slightest semblance of rule by outsiders again.

Western civilization has produced the lands of the greatest freedom and prosperity in the world, lands in which the futuristic dreams of a single world government can be formed, but even there, the views of such are of a government which may have many ethnically and racially ‘diverse’ people in it and running it, but they are all still imbued with a veneer of Western civilization. We would have what were, in effect, everyone, of every race, color and ethnicity, all being westernized white people!

Senator Kamala Harris Emhoff (D-CA) raised the issue of busing in the United States in an attack on former Vice President Joe Biden, for his early opposition to busing, at the time a major issue in his hometown of Wilmington, Delaware:

Sixteen years after the U.S. Supreme Court outlawed racial segregation in public schools, an attorney representing black families in Charlotte stood before the court. The landmark Brown v. Board of Education ruling, he argued, had failed to deliver on its promise.

“Black children and parents in Charlotte have struggled since Brown,” said the attorney, Julius Chambers. He urged the high court to embrace a plan to integrate Charlotte schools through a controversial method: busing black children to white schools, and vice versa.

The Supreme Court agreed, unanimously endorsing busing as a legitimate means of unraveling the segregation of children by race. The 1971 decision launched an explosive chapter in American history, touching off a long and polarizing battle that set public opinion against busing for decades, even as the programs succeeded in promoting integration.

Later, evidence would emerge that busing improved outcomes for black students, with no harm to white students. But that evidence came far too late to change public perceptions of a program that was hugely unpopular among whites and left blacks divided.

The vexing issue has reverberated through the Democratic presidential primary since last month’s debates, when Sen. Kamala D. Harris (D-Calif.) criticized former vice president Joe Biden for opposing court-ordered busing in the 1970s. But Harris soon found herself backpedaling when asked whether she would advocate busing today: Last week, she called it a tool to be “considered” but mandated only if local governments are “actively opposing integration.”

That position is not so far from Biden’s, and not a single Democratic candidate is arguing for a return to mandatory busing. Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) has promised to “execute and enforce desegregation orders” but has not said how. Most candidates have focused on creating incentives for districts and families to create diverse schools on their own.

That segregated schools are an issue in 2019, 65 years after Brown v Board of Education and 48 years after Swann v. Charlotte-Mecklenburg Board of Education points out the uncomfortable truth: even though children were educated in (somewhat) racially integrated schools, it has not led to the unspoken but very much hoped for result of integrated living patterns. Even when our schools were integrated, our neighborhoods were not, because white Americans still chose to live in mostly white neighborhoods and black Americans chose to live in mostly black neighborhoods. The government could use the police power of the state to bus children across town to integrate the schools, but it could not require people to buy or rent houses in ‘assigned’ neighborhoods. Black people in the United States did not become what the social engineers of the 1960s and 1970s had hoped, simply darker-skinned white people.

This, in the United States, a nation uniquely ‘diverse,’ in that our ethnic groups are scattered throughout the population, rather than in traditionally ethnic regions: we still have a population which is ‘diverse’ overall but still mostly segregated at the neighborhood level:

Even as the United States becomes increasingly diverse, neighborhood segregation patterns persist in large urban areas, including in the Washington metro region, according to five-year trend data from the Census Bureau.

Segregation has remained most entrenched between black and white residents, while segregation between whites and Hispanics and whites and Asians is more fluid, according to an analysis of the bureau’s latest American Community Survey data.

Some of the starkest black-white urban divide can be seen in Midwestern and Northeastern cities with long-concentrated and slow-growing black populations, including Buffalo, Chicago, Cleveland, Detroit, Milwaukee, New York and St. Louis, said William Frey, a senior demographer at the Brookings Institution, who analyzed the data.²

Integration in our public schools began in the 1960s — 1964 the school I attended — and 1970s, which means that the children in such schools are now at or nearing retirement; almost every homebuyer today grew up with racial integration in the schools, yet racial segregation still exists, due to the personal choices of American homebuyers and renters. If Americans, lacking the ethnic separation into different countries that exists across so much of the rest of the world, and lacking most of the history of real strife between national groups, are not integrated, is it reasonable to think that the people of other nations would accept classical liberal notions of integration?

The notion that we could have a single, worldwide government is a dream of some Westerners, but, at least for the foreseeable future, it is a ridiculous pipe dream.  The United Nations’ bureaucrats want to keep pushing for more and more authority into that slowly dilapidating building in Turtle Bay, but that needs to be firmly resisted.  There may, may! be a few useful functions of the United Nations, but we need to firmly reject anything which subjects the United States to the UN’s will.
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¹ – The exception would be Star Trek: Deep Space Nine, the best of the franchise. While the Federation is still a happy, happy place, Bajor is depicted as wracked with strife after the Cardassian occupation was ended.
² – Interestingly enough, the article also notes that segregation levels have mostly declined in the South: “Atlanta, Houston, Louisville, Memphis, Miami, New Orleans, Orlando and Tampa.” That kind of refutes the notions of liberals that racism is a mostly southern problem.
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