More, including pictures (check out the new one of Blago, haha), at Commodore Perry

Let’s contrast this to:Andrew Jackson.

As the story goes, Jackson’s opposition labeled him “Jackass” during the 1832 campaign for President. But instead of either buckling to or ignoring the comments, Jackson decided to run with them, using the donkey on his own campaign posters as a symbol for his “stubborn” stand against the Second Bank of the United States. Jackson was generally seen as a strong man, who was very firm and unmovable, both in war and in politics, but he was flexible enough to take the satire against him and use it for his own advantage. Whether you agree with Jacksonian Democracy or not, that’s pretty good.

Today, we have Barack Obama, who takes a magazine cartoon written by somebody else that is meant to demonize his opponents and criticizes it as if he is responding to a political attack ad against himself (typical liberal logic). Even though Obama says that he takes no personal offense to the *New Yorker’s *cover this week, it is clear that he does not have nearly the savvy of Old Hickory. Interestingly enough, Jackson himself was a candidate who ran on a platform of “change”, claiming to represent the common man’s views, and wanting to be the first Western president.

My Point: Obama is not even the second coming of Andrew Jackson; how can he possibly be the second coming of anyone’s Messiah? It doesn’t matter what your political beliefs are; to buy into all of the Obama hype is to blind yourself from history, and you will only get the exact opposite of what you “hope” for (see: Cuba, Germany).

In 1870, Thomas Nast published a new cartoon, permanently and appropriately associating the new, non-Jacksonian Dems with being jackasses. John McCain may not be conservative enough for many of us, but he is assuredly a war hero, and he is definitely a candidate with whom you will know exactly what you are getting.

DONT GIVE UP THE SHIP

Crossposted at Commodore Perry.