There has been no shortage of media coverage regarding the current abortion scandal surrounding Planned Parenthood and selling of fetal body parts.  With the release of yet another video from the Center for Medical Progress, it appropriate to take a look back at Roe v. Wade and Supreme Court Justice Harry Blackmun, the author of the Court’s opinion, and what that decision has sown.

Defending abortion, in Thornburgh v. American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists Blackmun wrote:

Few decisions are more personal and intimate, more properly private, or more basic to individual dignity and autonomy, than a woman’s decision – with the guidance of her physician and within the limits specified in Roe – whether to end her pregnancy. A woman’s right to make that choice freely is fundamental…

However, in his dissent in Beal v Doe in 1973, Blackmun also wrote:

[The cost of elective aborton] “is far less than the cost of maternity care and delivery, and holds no comparison whatsoever with the welfare costs that will burden the state for the new indigents and their support in the long, long years ahead.”

With this statement, the seeds were sown for what has ultimately become the cavalier and indifferent attitude toward the unborn.  Blackmun’s dissent unfortunately reflects what millions of pro-choice Americans already believe: the unborn child is and has become an undue financial burden, as well as an emotional burden and an inconvenience.

Liberal blogger Amanda Marcotte, one of the patron saints of the pro-choice movement confirmed these beliefs in March of 2014 with these statements after the Supreme Court ruling in Burwell v Hobby Lobby:

“I don’t particularly like babies. They are loud and smelly and, above all other things, demanding. No matter how much free day care you throw at women, babies are still time-sucking monsters with their constant neediness. No matter how flexible you make my work schedule, my entire life would be overturned by a baby. I like  my life how it is, with my ability to do what I want when I want without having to arrange for a babysitter. I like sex in any room of the house I please. I don’t want a baby. I’ve heard your pro-baby arguments. Glad those work for you, but they are unconvincing to me. Nothing will make me want a baby.”

“This is why, if my birth control fails, I am totally having an abortion. Given the choice between living my life how I please and having my body within my control and the fate of a lentil-sized, brainless embryo that has half a chance of dying on its own anyway, I choose me. Here’s another uncomfortable fact for anti-choicers: Just because a woman does want children doesn’t mean she wants them now. Either way, what she wants trumps the non-existent desires of a mindless pre-person that is so small it can be removed in about two minutes during an outpatient procedure. Your cavities fight harder to stay in place.”

Marcotte’s statements reflect just how far a segment of our society has fallen.  None of this however seems to enter the consciousness of the pro-choice movement. From 1973 thru 2011 (the latest of which statistics are available) nearly 53 million abortions were performed in the U.S., the majority of which were strictly for birth control.

Planned Parenthood, in addition to now selling vital organs of dead fetuses, performs on average 325,000 abortions a year.  All this of course is supported and funded to the tune of $500 million a year from the federal government. Planned Parenthood of course contributes heavily to the Democratic Party. Is it fair to say a sizable amount of the $500 million ends up in Democratic campaign coffers?

The indecency of how the least defenseless are now treated borders on the inconceivable, and not confined to the U.S. Least we forget that it was last year aborted and miscarried fetuses were reported burned and used to heat hospitals in the U.K. Fetuses were also reported burned in an Oregon waste burning facility.

Could any of this have been prevented? As reported by Judge Andrew Napolitano, numerous attempts were made during the George W. Bush presidency to introduce a simple one-line statement: “The fetus in the womb shall be, for all constitutional and legal purposes, a person.” For reasons that seem incomprehensible, the Republican congressional leaders kept this proposal from being voted upon.

Which brings us back to Justice Blackmun, a registered Republican at the time of his appointment.  The nomination was from former President Richard Nixon in 1970.