Screen Shot: https://twitter.com/NorahODonnell/status/1199111510569758723

 

It’s amazing that President Trump has been able to accomplish so much in three years given the subversion of so many unelected government officials. On his way out of the Pentagon on Monday, the angry former Secretary of the Navy, Richard Spencer, sat for an interview with CBS News’ David Martin who says, “He’s not going quietly.”

“What message does that send to the troops? That you can get away with things. We have to have good order and discipline. It’s the backbone of what we do,” Spencer said to Martin.

Spencer said he doesn’t think the President understands the full definition of a warfighter. “A warfighter is a profession of arms. And the profession of arms has standards…that they hold themselves to.”

Navy seal Eddie Gallagher was convicted of dishonoring the uniform by posing with the body of a dead ISIS fighter.

Secretary of Defense Mark Esper, who was traveling overseas, said he fired Spencer because he “had proposed a deal whereby if the President allowed the Navy to handle the case, he would guarantee that Eddie Gallagher would be restored to rank, allowed to retain his trident and permitted to retire.”

Spencer told Martin, “I will take the bad on me for not letting him know I did that. But he was completely informed of this because his Chief of Staff was briefed on it.” There’s always a but, isn’t there?

According to CBS, Spencer said he was trying to head off an order from President Trump which as he said in his resignation letter, “I cannot in good conscience obey.”

He added, “What do I stand for as Secretary of the Navy. Good order and discipline of the United States Navy. That’s a prime tenet. This, in fact, erodes that.”

Martin asks him, “What wrong with following a lawful order from the Commander-in-Chief?”

Spencer replies, “Nothing, everyone should follow a lawful order. That’s good order and discipline. I could not, in my conscience, do this.”

Afterward, Spencer and his wife posted a photo of a dumpster fire on their Instagram page with the caption, “The current state of U.S. Navy Leadership summed up in one photo.”

I would argue that Spencer’s words, “We have to have good order and discipline. It’s the backbone of what we do,” apply even more so when it comes to following an order from the President of the United States. Members of the military take an oath to follow all lawful orders issued by their superior officers. In Spencer’s case, that superior officer was the Commander-in-Chief and it was a lawful order.

If, as Spencer says, he couldn’t follow the order due to his conscience, he should have resigned quietly. Instead, he chose to act behind the scenes. A senior U.S. official told Fox News Spencer was fired for dishonesty (lack of candor) and for undermining the military justice system.

On his way out the door, he stopped to make some angry remarks, then went home and posted a photo of a dumpster fire and more angry words on his Instagram page.

Does Spencer consider that behavior to be good order and discipline? I don’t.