For those who are old enough to remember, there was a prank caller duo in the early 90’s called “The Jerky Boys.” Long before the internet went mainstream, people got ahold of The Jerky Boys famous tapes from a friend. You’d record it and pass it along to another friend. The two played various characters when making the calls including one named Sol Rosenberg. In one episode, Sol wants to sue for “punitive damages” and even threatens to sue the lawyer he’s talking to about the “case.” The lawyer is incredulous and asks, “Sue me? You want to sue me?” and Sol responds, “Sue everybody!”

With the talk coming from Donald Trump’s attorney about Robert Mueller, it appears Trump has a mindset of, “Fire everybody!”

From The Week:

“Will the president promise not to interfere, not attempt at any time to order the deputy attorney general to fire Robert Mueller?” asked ABC host George Stephanopoulos. “Look, the president of the United States, as we all know, is a unitary executive,” Sekulow replied. “But the president is going to seek the advice of his counsel and inside the government as well as outside. And I’m not going to speculate on what he will or will not do.”

“I can’t imagine that that issue is going to arise,” he added moments later, “but that again is an issue that the president with his advisers would discuss if there was a basis.”

What is President Trump going to do? Have Mueller over for an intimate dinner and ask Mueller about loyalty?

Then there’s this:

Comey has made clear that he vetted his prepared Senate testimony with Mueller and his aides to avoid revealing information that might compromise the special counsel’s pursuit of possible criminal wrongdoing.

Yet by vetting his testimony, Comey provided Trump’s defense team an opening to question his coziness with Mueller. The two had worked together during the George W. Bush administration when Comey was deputy attorney general and Mueller was FBI director, a position he kept until late 2013, when Comey succeeded him.

“What is the role of the special counsel here?’’ asked Sekulow, who is chief counsel for the Washington-based American Center for Law and Justice. “The special counsel allowed James Comey to testify. James Comey said he reviewed his testimony with the special counsel.… I think this is unprecedented.’’

How is it unprecedented? Comey had to speak with somebody before testifying to make clear what he could and could not talk about in an open session. Does Sekulow think Comey should have spoken to Jeff Sessions? Sessions recused himself. What about Rod Rosenstein? Right, Comey should talk to the guy who recommended his termination?

Naturally, Comey spoke directly with Robert Mueller. It was the only reasonable choice Comey had at that point.

As for Mueller, keep in mind that Trump fired Comey because he wasn’t meeting Trump’s definition of “loyalty” by going out and playing Trump’s PR person and telling the public Trump wasn’t personally under investigation by the FBI.

What’s to stop Trump from firing Mueller if he doesn’t like how things are going?