AP featured image
Dr. Deborah Birx, White House coronavirus response coordinator, speaks about the coronavirus in the James Brady Press Briefing Room at the White House, Monday, April 13, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
 

It seems that America is finally turning a corner as it approaches the decline of the COVID-19 outbreak. Dr. Deborah Birx, the response coordinator for the White House coronavirus task force, recently provided some good news for Americans who are worried about the virus and fed up with the excessive restrictions that states have placed on them.

In an appearance on Fox News’ “Watters World,” Birx indicated that the number of COVID-19 cases and deaths are expected to drastically decrease next month. “We believe that both the hospitalizations, the ICU need, and frankly, the number of people who have succumbed to this disease will be dramatically decreased by the end of May,” she said.

Birx continued:

“The cases are a different issue because now, as we’re expanding more and more testing and — remember, our testing was very much prioritized to people who really needed it for decision-making to people who were in the hospital, people who were sick, frontline responders and nurses.”

This should be some welcome news for those living in the hotspot areas that the virus has infected the most. Her remarks come as several states begin to restart commerce this coming week. Governors are determining the best course of action for opening their economies without causing a resurgence of the pandemic.

The doctor also called out the corporate media for its skewed reportage on the coronavirus. “I think the media is very slicey and dicey about how they put sentences together in order to create headlines. … We know for millennials in other studies that some people may only read the headlines. And if there’s not a graphic, they’re not going to look any further than that,” she said.

Birx also pointed out how the media uses deceptive headlines, knowing that their readers will not read all the way to the end of the article to glean the information that is actually relevant. “And I think we have to be responsible about our headlines. I think often, the reporting maybe accurate in paragraph three, four, and five. But I’m not sure how many people actually get to paragraph three, four, and five,” she added.

The doctor argued that the press has a responsibility to “really ensure that the headlines reflect the science and data that is in their piece itself.”

 

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