Is it that Rep. Ilhan Omar (D-MN) just doesn’t get it, or is it that she’s playing the anti-American progressive left like a violin for her own ends? (Or, as many RedState commenters say, is it both, and we should “embrace the healing power of ‘and'”?)

After being grilled over a comment she made at a CAIR banquet that CAIR was founded after 9/11 because “some people” in the Muslim community “did something,” namely flying airplanes full of innocent people into the Twin Towers, she shot back with an inane comment about President George W. Bush’s comments at Ground Zero promising consequences for the terrorist act.

As usual, she hides behind her identity as a Muslim woman, claiming bigotry any time her words are called into question.

Friday morning, a portion of a years-old interview she gave on public TV in Minneapolis surfaced online which showed Omar giggling about Americans’ fear of terrorist organizations like Hezbollah and Al Qaeda. Omar was telling the interviewer about her experiences in a “terrorism class” in college.

She said, giggling:

“I took a terrorism class…The thing that was interesting in the class was, every time the professor said Al Qaeda… his shoulders went up…al Qaeda, you know, Hezbollah?”

The interviewer immediately mocked the professor and wanted more information.

He’s an expert. What is his name? Where does he live?

Omar refused to name him, and continued with her main point – that Americans are unjustly trying to demonize terrorist groups, which are, you know, just like the U.S. Army or the United States of America. No difference whatsoever. (That’s sarcasm.)

“We are not going to say his name, but you’ll probably get to see him on CNN. You don’t say America with an intensity…you don’t say the Army with an intensity. But you say these names because you want that word to carry weight. You want it to leave something with you. It’s — you know, it’s said with a deeper voice.”

Sure, Ilhan. The names of those organizations should carry weight and leave something with a person. If they’re not to be feared, then why did your family immigrate to the United States?