Here’s a story for the “what the hell were you thinking?” file. An elementary school teacher in Milwaukee has parents outraged after using a Ouija board in her kindergarten classroom.

“What did you do in school today, sweetheart?”  

“We colored, learned some letters, communed with the anguished spirits of the dead. You know, the usual. Can I have some cookies?”

An outraged mother is calling on Milwaukee Public Schools officials to fire a kindergarten teacher who introduced the young students in her class to a Ouija board

The mom, who asked to not be publicly named, said the game was used on Friday in her 5-year-old’s classroom at Zablocki Elementary.

“They were shutting off the lights and making it dark and talking to spirits. That’s not something that should be at school,” the mother said of the game, which is said to be able to channel spirits.

This must be part of Common Core or something.

The family said the children are too young to be exposed to the concepts of Ouija boards, and they believe the teacher should just stick to curriculum.

The 5-year-old is now having nightmares, the mother said.

“He’s scared now to go to bed at night, to be in the dark, anything alone,” she said.

The teacher said that it was all in fun. I’m not a parent but it seems like a no-brainer that a 5 year old’s idea of fun does not typically involve having the sh*t scared out of him.

The teacher has been put on administrative leave while the incident is investigated. The mother who reported her is getting grief online, presumably from all the people that think dabbling in the occult is an appropriate kindergarten activity.

“I’m happy that she’s being investigated. Maybe she’ll think twice about doing something in the future,” the mother said.

Aware of the backlash she’s receiving online for speaking up, she said she’s only protecting her son.

“I feel like what I did for my child was the right thing, but everyone is entitled to their opinion.”

The teacher ought to hang on to the Ouija board. It may be the only way to contact her future career as a teacher.