It is easy for Americans to believe their slight discomfort (or imaginary discomfort) is just the worst. In reality, our society as a whole has it very good.

Although American feminists preach otherwise, we know we’re some of the most privileged women in the world, living in freedom, and surrounded by a wealth of opportunity.

Still, gender issues are all the rage. The seemingly never-ending discussion over where people should be allowed to use the bathroom in public continues. Such a fight is labeled as a kind of “new civil rights”. This is nothing but revolting, and seriously muddies the real definition. The world of entertainment takes part, too. Singer Beyoncé promoted a new music project called “Lemonade” on Saturday night. Social media exploded and lauded her for her powerful feminist voice. We’re told we should pay attention to the lyrics Queen Bey uses, for they represent a strong woman. “Oh, she’s so brave!” No, not really.

Meanwhile, on the other side of the world, women live in horror just for being female. As The Mirror reports:

At least 250 Iraqi woman were executed by Islamic State fighters – because they refused to become sex slaves.

The brutal slaughter took place in Mosul, Iraq’s second largest city, which has been overrun by Islamic State militants.

A spokesperson for the Kurdish Democratic Party, one of the forces fighting ISIS in Iraq, said: “At least 250 girls have so far been executed by IS for refusing to accept the practice of sexual jihad, and sometimes the families of the girls were also executed for rejecting to submit to IS’ request.”

Officials say that woman living in the city are treated as commodities and have their human rights routinely abuse abused.

Over there, women are enslaved and become sexual objects. If they refuse to submit to that kind of inhumane domination, they’re executed. I would call that a real war on women, wouldn’t you?

No sideways glance on the subway, catcall on the sidewalk, or smaller paycheck (more than likely due to your own choices than anything), even comes close to the horrific reality mentioned above. Frankly, I don’t care about public bathroom protests and feminist power ballads. They are weak attempts at relevancy by people who already have everything, and then some.

It would be something to see American gender warriors and feminist icons use their platforms to highlight real female oppression, but they won’t. Why? Because it doesn’t exist in the USA. To them, that’s a problem. If there’s nothing left to fight for, then “equality” has finally been reached. They would prefer never to get to that point. Their grievances keep them in business.