Newly Signed Abortion Ban in Ohio Makes Discriminating Against This Disability Illegal

Kimberly Ross // Posted at 6:04 pm on December 23, 2017

Females in the United States have it pretty good.

They are blessed with near-endless opportunities. They can go about their lives free from the constraints that women in many other parts of the world must endure. They are also legally free to choose to end the lives of their unborn children all for the sake of convenience.

While change on a national scale may take decades, on the state level, there have been numerous pro-life victories of the legislative kind.

On Friday, Governor John Kasich of Ohio signed an abortion restriction that targets prenatal discrimination against those with Down Syndrome.

Gov. John Kasich signed into law House Bill 214, the 20th abortion restriction passed since he took office in 2011, and 14 other bills Friday morning.

Under the law, doctors who know of a prenatal Down syndrome diagnosis and perform an abortion could be charged with a fourth-degree felony, punishable by up to 18 months in prison. There is no punishment for the woman who seeks the abortion.

The new law will take effect sometime in late March.

Supporters said that allowing abortions after a fetal Down syndrome diagnosis amounted to discrimination and modern day eugenics.

Naturally, NARAL and other pro-abort groups are outraged at this new law. After all, how dare abortion be limited in any way! Isn’t the Leftist mantra now “abortion on demand without apology”? I guess that extends to “defective” persons in the womb. Sadly, the diagnosis of Down Syndrome automatically makes them unwanted in the eyes of too many adults.

Currently, North Dakota has a similar law in place. In 2016, Indiana passed a nearly identical measure that was then blocked by a judge for supposedly being unconstitutional. This very thing spurred some Republican lawmakers in Ohio to actually vote against the legislation.

Reportedly, the rate of abortion after a woman has received a prenatal diagnosis of DS sits at 67%. While many women elect to not have this type of pregnancy testing done, it’s clear that for the ones who do, the majority decides that the disability their children may have exceeds the worth of their life. But many times, prenatal diagnoses are incorrect and a baby is born without disability or difficulty. It is impossible to know just how many lives have been taken all because of a prenatal diagnosis that was wrong in the first place. And as even NBC News reported, the rate of failure in prenatal testing may be encouraging many abortions of otherwise completely healthy children.

Each life is precious. Each life has inherent worth. We know this to be true no matter if a child is born completely healthy or with the added difficulty of a physical or mental disability.

Deciding to end a life through abortion based on what hardships may be encountered in the future, by parent and child, is no way to view the miracle of pregnancy.

It remains to be seen whether this new Ohio law will be challenged, but that would not be surprising. The pro-abortion movement is eager to preach that we live during a time in which women are held back from freedom when it comes to reproductive decisions.

Meanwhile, the most helpless among us, the unborn, are picked off by an abortion industry that salivates at the opportunity to deny them life.