A city worker uses a power washer to clean the sidewalk by a tent city along Division Street Friday, Feb. 26, 2016, in San Francisco. Homeless people have until the end of Friday to vacate a rambling tent city along a busy San Francisco street declared a health hazard by city officials earlier this week. The mayor’s office says about 40 tents remain, down from a high of 140 tents this winter. The tents have lined both sides of a street under a freeway overpass for months, drawing complaints from residents and businesses. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg)

San Francisco has a poop problem.

The liberal utopia has utopia’ed it’s way all the way back to the days when people used the streets as their personal toilets and disease from the open sewage plagued towns and cities.

Like any good Californian utopia, the city of San Francisco isn’t reenforcing it’s vagrancy laws, empowering mental health services to force mentally ill homeless people into treatment or ending the needle exchange welfare program that attracts the homeless from all over the country. No, instead the Golden Gate city is just hiring people to clean up the poop. The homeless and drug addicts are still allowed to poop wherever they want without consequence, but now the city will come up behind them and clean it up and all it will cost the taxpayer is…

$184,000 per poop person, according to the San Francisco Chronicle.

San Francisco Public Works has a $72.5 million-a-year street cleaning budget — including spending $12 million a year on what essentially have become housekeeping services for homeless encampments.

The costs include $2.8 million for a Hot Spots crew to wash down the camps and remove any biohazards, $2.3 million for street steam cleaners, $3.1 million for the Pit Stop portable toilets, plus the new $830,977-a-year Poop Patrol to actively hunt down and clean up human waste.

(By the way, the poop patrolers earn $71,760 a year, which swells to $184,678 with mandated benefits.)

It isn’t just poop that one of the most famous cities on the planet is budgeting for. The Chronicle also reports that a “needle squad” earns up to $19/hour to clean up used drug needles.

At the same time, the Department of Public Health has an additional $700,000 set aside for a 10-member, needle cleanup squad, complete with it’s own minivan. The $19-an-hour needle cleanup jobs were approved as part of the latest budget crafted largely by former Mayor Mark Farrell.

The new needle crew is on top of the $364,000 that the health department already was spending on a four-member needle team.

A number of syringes are seen in the remains of a tent city being cleared by city workers along Division Street Friday, Feb. 26, 2016, in San Francisco. Homeless people have until the end of Friday to vacate a rambling tent city along a busy San Francisco street declared a health hazard by city officials earlier this week. The mayor’s office says about 40 tents remain, down from a high of 140 tents this winter. The tents have lined both sides of a street under a freeway overpass for months, drawing complaints from residents and businesses. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg)

San Francisco’s mayor London Breed goes to great pains not to blame the actual addicts and homeless for the dangerously unsanitary conditions in one of the richest and most advanced cities in the richest and most advanced nation on the planet. No, of course not. Like a good socialist she spreads out the blame across the spectrum, but mostly on taxpayers.

The mayor, however, makes clear that the burden of solving all the city’s street problems doesn’t rest solely on City Hall.

“The responsibility is with everyone,” Breed said. “People shouldn’t be comfortable throwing their trash on the ground, and if people have recommendations on where they want trash cans, they can call 311.”

In a city where a homeless person can poop in front of homes, schools and businesses with impunity it seems like it would be easy for people not to care about where they throw their trash. Sometimes you just get tired of being the one who has to follow the rules.

Tony Bennett famously left his heart in San Francisco, but it is for sure covered in feces by now.