British Prime Minister Theresa May announced Friday that she plans to step down from her post by June 7th, a move that has been called for by opposing parties and her own in the months following the controversial Brexit vote.

Speaking in Downing Street, May said it had been “the honour of my life” to serve as Britain’s second female prime minister. Her voice breaking, she said she would leave “with no ill will, but with enormous and enduring gratitude to have had the opportunity to serve the country I love”.

The prime minister listed a series of what she said were her government’s achievements, including tackling the deficit, reducing unemployment and boosting funding for mental health.

May’s failure to provide adequate leadership regarding the Brexit details ultimately led to her ineffectiveness as a party head.

Her fate was sealed after a 10-point “new Brexit deal”, announced in a speech on Tuesday, infuriated Tory backbenchers and many of her own cabinet – while falling flat with the Labour MPs it was meant to persuade.

The leader of the House of Commons, Andrea Leadsom, resigned on Wednesday, rather than present the Brexit bill to parliament.

A string of other cabinet ministers had also expressed concerns, including Sajid Javid, Jeremy Hunt, Chris Grayling and David Mundell.

In particular, they rejected May’s promise to give MPs a vote on a second referendum as the Brexit bill passed through parliament, and implement the result – which they felt came too close to endorsing the idea.

May’s replacement has yet to be voted on but many suspect her much more conservative, pro-Brexit counterpart Boris Johnson will get the job.

Unsurprisingly the Twitter class weren’t much more excited about the possibility of a Prime Minister Johnson.

The deadline for the Brexit departure is October 31.