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House Speaker Nancy Pelosi of Calif. speaks outside her office on Capitol Hill, Monday, March 23, 2020. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, Pool)

As the violence across America continued, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi found time to stop by “Morning Joe” on Wednesday to discuss not only her “gift of faith,” but a “spark of divinity in every person” that, in her bizarre way of thinking, is somehow relevant to the continuing unrest.

As we reported earlier in the week, this is the same Nancy Pelosi who castigated President Donald Trump over his visit to riot-damaged St. John’s church — during which he held up a Bible — by grabbing her own Bible in an attempt to mimic Trump. Pelosi’s stunts always end up making her look more like a fool than Trump, but I digress.

Anyway, let’s get this out of the way right off the bat, shall we?

Nancy Pelosi castigating Donald Trump, or anyone else, for carrying a Bible, pausing in front of a church to pray, reflect, or anything else faith related, is tantamount to Michael Moore jumping ugly on a marathon runner for eating a granola bar after a long, grueling race.

After all, this is the same woman who has cited her “deep Catholic faith” as the reason for her support of late-term of abortion. “Sacred ground,” she calls it, for which she has been criticized by the Catholic News Agency, Catholic Association, and other prominent Catholics.

Nonetheless, on Wednesday morning, Pelosi was all about her faith.


“Shockingly,” TDS-riddled Joe Scarborough lobbed a softball right down the middle of the plate for the equally-TDS-riddled Speaker.

“And finally, I know that you’re a person of great faith.  We’ve talked about it, of course, off TV a good bit, and we’ve talked about it a good bit on.  So, talk about your faith, if you will, in America that we are going to get through this.  […] Talk about, talk about how Americans should not be in despair…”

Needless to say, Pelosi was more than willing to pontificate.

“That’s right. Well, I appreciate your focus on faith, because I do believe — you know, sometimes people say to me, ‘Where is hope? Where can I go find hope?’ And I say hope is sitting there where it always has been, right between faith and charity; faith, hope and charity. Faith gives people hope in the goodness of others, and so, it’s very important.”

Ah, but not everyone has “the gift” that Pelosi has.

Now, faith is a gift, not everyone has it. Sometimes people say to me, ‘How come you believe this or that.’ I say, ‘Well, I have the gift of faith.’ And that gift of faith tells us that we’re all God’s children, that we’re made in the image and likeness of God, and there’s a spark of divinity in every person that we have to respect, including in ourselves that we have to act upon.

So where do we go from here, according to the Speaker?

So, we — whatever faith people have, that doesn’t — you know — I happen to be a devout, practicing Catholic.  Whatever their faith, it is predicated on the goodness of people, and that’s something that we believe in and that gives us hope.

“Devout, practicing Catholic” and “spark of divinity in every person” aside, one wonders — this one, anyway — why Cardinal Raymond Burke in 2013 issued an emphatic call in which he said Pelosi and other pro-abortion Catholic politicians “must” be denied Communion, and Pope Benedict in 2009 told her Catholics cannot support abortion.

Here’s the thing. This post is neither a discussion about abortion, nor necessarily about whether or not Pelosi’s “deep, practicing faith” is as “deep” and “practicing” as she claims it to be.

But it does raise the question of why “Pious Pelosi” believes she is qualified to torch Trump over his professed faith, one day, and tout hers, the next, all while seemingly suggesting that faith is somehow behind the violence that has gripped America for nine straight days.

Perhaps the Speaker’s “spark of divinity” is more “divine” than that of us mere mortals — not to mention Donald Trump.

Mike Miller
Political junkie. Former senior writer and editor at Independent Journal Review. Realist. Slayer of hypocrisy. Sports lover (except for soccer, of course). Insufferable pizza snob.
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