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Oprah Winfrey waves the audience during a tribute to Nelson Mandela and promoting gender equality event at University of Johannesburg in Soweto, South Africa, Thursday, Nov. 29, 2018. (AP Photo/Themba Hadebe)

According to billionaire media mogul Oprah Winfrey, if you’re white in America — regardless of your station in life — your “whiteness” gives you a “leg up” over people of color. That reality is “inescapable.”

Moreover, as Oprah sees it, given that white people’s “whiteness” is inescapable, if you’re white, you automatically enjoy “white privilege,” apparently making you at least a tad racist, even if you fail to realize it.

Makes sense? Of course it doesn’t.

On an episode of “The Oprah Conversation” titled “Uncomfortable Conversations with a Black Man: Part 1,” Winfrey and former NFL linebacker Emmanuel Acho interviewed white guests, obviously included for the sole purpose of admitting they were racist — even if they were previously unaware of it — as reported by The Blaze.

According to Oprah, who is reportedly worth $3.5 billion, a white “caste system” has been “put in place” in America, presumably to give white people “a leg up” over people of color:

“There are white people who are not as powerful as the system of white people — the caste system that’s been put in place — but they still, no matter where they are on the rung, or the ladder of success, they still have their whiteness […] (Whites have a) leg up.

You still have your whiteness. That’s what the term ‘white privilege’ is. It means that whiteness still gives you an advantage, no matter. It is the fundamental issue.”

In other words, as Oprah sees it, even if you’re a white person who’s low on the white totem pole (apologies to Native Americans) of the white “caste system,” you’re still “racist, simply because your whiteness automatically affords you “white privilege.”

Among Oprah’s white guests was a man named Seth, who told the host he must be racist, because he’s never been actively anti-racist.

(You can’t make this stuff up.)

Of course Oprah teed it up for Seth, to make it easy for him to admit his “racism.” That “woke” thing, you know.

“You’ve become woke during this period, and realized in that awakening that you are racist, right? I just want to know how that happened.”

Seth admitted that he’s apparently been a racist his whole life, but only now does he realize how he’s been racist.

“I was born in the ’70s. I was born and raised in Manhattan. I’ve always considered myself to be liberal. Now I’m not only a friend of people of color, but also an advocate […] but this movement over the last month has been powerful. […] I realized that I couldn’t be not racist. I realized that I either was a racist or an anti-racist, and I wasn’t — I’m not — an anti-racist.”

Oprah’s discussion with another white guest — Lisa, a Californian, no less — was just as convoluted. Lisa’s “crime”? She told Oprah that she obviously has “unconscious biases that (only) white people have.”

Pretty sure Lisa was searching for “subconscious,” although, in her case, “unconscious” works better, here.

Acho jumped in, at this point, to respond to Lisa’s comments:

“Here’s what I told my friends with their white children. I said ‘Y’all live in a white cul-de-sac, in a white neighborhood, in a white city, in a white state. If you were not careful, your children will live their whole white life, and at 26, 27, they’ll end up being a part of the problem, because you just let them and allowed them to live a completely white, sheltered, and cultureless life.”

In other words, white parents, it is your responsibility to make sure you don’t allow your white children to live in a white “cultureless” world.

Thing is, Oprah already explained that by virtue of being white, white people have white privilege, and therefore have at least a bit of racism embedded in them, regardless of upon which rung of the (white) ladder they live. “No matter what,” she said.

Very confusing. Or is it? (See: “white guilt.”)

Here’s more Acho on his “Uncomfortable Conversations with a Black Man” YouTube channel in June:

Anyway, as Acho explained on the Oprah episode, “collective” white people are the real problem in America:

“As a black person, white people — the proverbial phrase of white people — they run America. CEOs, Fortune 500 companies, execs, ownership. They run America. Not an individual white person, but collective white people […] I firmly believe that if the white person is your problem, only the white person can be your solution.”

And there it is “white” America. “If the white person is your problem, only the white person can be your solution.” Then again, as Oprah said, your “whiteness” is, inescapably, “white privilege.”

In 2020 post-George-Floyd America, that puts you in quite a pickle.

Mike Miller
Political junkie. Former senior writer and editor at Independent Journal Review. Embraces objectivity, rejects hypocrisy. Insufferable pizza snob.
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