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Amid concerns of the spread of COVID-19, science teachers Ann Darby, left, and Rosa Herrera check-in students before a summer STEM camp at Wylie High School Tuesday, July 14, 2020, in Wylie, Texas. (AP Photo/LM Otero)

As kids across America begin to return to school, a high school principal in Alabama had already prepared his students for the COVID restrictions they”ll encounter when they return, later this month.

Dr. Quentin Lee, the principal of Childersburg High School, in late July posted a parody video on his YouTube channel of rapper MC Hammer’s classic “You  Can’t Touch This.” Lee not only wrote the lyrics; be busted out Hammer’s trademark moves in style.

As of today, the video has received nearly 5.4 million views.

In response to the video going viral, Lee told Alabama NewsCenter he “enjoys doing silly stuff” — for a purpose, politics aside.

“We are working tirelessly to make sure school is a place where students can be accepted, loved, and clean. Everybody needs love, regardless of political party or ethnic background. If we can allow people to laugh and forget about their problems, then we’ve accomplished that.”

As Alabama NewCentral reported, Lee’s “Can’t Touch This” parody is a follow-up to an April video about COVID, in which, as he described it, “it was just me sitting at my desk screaming.”

After the first video received national media attention, Lee said he “figured it was time to do something different.”

The rapping principal told Alabama NewsCenter he hopes people who see his videos will not only get a good laugh, but more importantly take to heart the underlying message of protecting themselves and those around them from Covic.

“We have got to make safety a cool thing. If we don’t see the warning signs, we’ll be doomed for destruction. By following these guidelines, we could save someone’s life.”

President Trump has pushed for the reopening of school for weeks, insisting that a return to school poses little risk of students contracting COVID. During a phone call with “Fox and Friends” on Wednesday morning, Trump said children are “almost immune” from the virus:

“If you look at children, children are almost — and I would almost say definitely — but almost immune from this disease.”

Within hours, Facebook and Twitter removed the video from their respective platforms. A spokesman for Facebook said:

“This video includes false claims that a group of people is immune from COVID-19 which is a violation of our policies around harmful COVID misinformation.”

Here’s the thing. Trump has a habit of playing loose with words. We get it. But that doesn’t mean — particularly in this case — that the messages he attempts to convey are without merit.

As BizPac Review reported on Friday, a recent article from the American Academy of Pediatrics cited studies conducted among hundreds of students in France, Australia, and Ireland, none of which found instances of student-to student transmission of COVID.

Do those studies proved it can’t happen? of course not.

But as the debate continues — often heated — over the risk, or lack thereof, at least a principal in Alabama has found a way to guard the safety of his students, politics be damned. Not a bad idea at all.

Mike Miller
Political junkie. Former senior writer and editor at Independent Journal Review. Embraces objectivity, rejects hypocrisy. Insufferable pizza snob.
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