Rick Perry Bans “Climate Change” Language From Energy Department

Posted at 10:31 am on April 02, 2017 by Martin Walsh

The Energy Department’s Office of International Climate and Clean Energy instructed their staff not to use the phrases “climate change,” “emissions reduction” or “Paris Agreement” in their reports, according to Politico.

Politico reports that a top supervisor in the Office of International Climate and Clean Energy made it clear to all employees in the agency on Tuesday that they were no longer allowed to use any language legitimizing “climate change” in written communications.

As a reminder, Texas firebrand Rick Perry is the newly appointed Secretary of Energy. It is important to note that one of his first major actions in his new role was to peel back Obama-era climate change policies that are scientifically questionable on many fronts.

The new agenda at the Dept. of Energy came on the same day as President Trump signing a multi-part executive order that reversed Obama-era climate change policies.

According to the text of the order from Politico, it will promote “clean and safe development of our Nation’s vast energy resources, while at the same time avoiding regulatory burdens that unnecessarily encumber energy production, constrain economic growth, and prevent job creation.”

According to the Office of International Climate and Clean Energy’s website:

“The Office of International Climate Office of International Climate and Clean Energy (ICCE) … serves as the focal point for international climate change and clean energy activities within the United States Department of Energy (DOE). The Office coordinates DOE participation in international forums that focus on these topics, such as the Clean Energy Ministerial, United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, and the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. It also develops and implements international climate and clean energy initiatives consistent with Administration policy objectives and coordinates the related efforts of other DOE program offices.”

The global climate change industry costs around $1.5 trillion annually, according to Climate Change Business Journal.

Global land temperatures plummeted by one degree Celsius since the middle of 2016 – the biggest and steepest fall ever recorded.