As Republicans seek to pass a bill to keep the government running smoothly, Democrats have now hinted they have the votes to shut down the government.


Senate Minority Leader Sen. Charles Schumer of N.Y., speaks following a Democratic policy luncheon on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Sept. 12, 2017. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

Republicans need 60 votes in order to break a Democrat-led filibuster of their continuing resolution, which would keep the government funding going until a long-term budget is passed. But Democrats now have over 40 votes to block it:

“I’m concerned that we, yeah, we may not have 60 votes in the Senate,” South Dakota Sen. John Thune, the third-ranking Senate Republican, said Thursday morning. “And I think that’s obviously problematic.”

Previous government shutdowns have been caused by one party in the Congress and the other in the Presidency, as when Tip O’Neill sparred with Ronald Reagan, Newt Gingrich faced down Bill Clinton, and John Boehner took on Barack Obama.

Republicans are on the clock for what, historically, has caused Republicans to go down in the polls.