Actress Salma Hayek Pens New York Times Op-Ed Defining Her Repeated Harassment From Harvey Weinstein

Posted at 9:42 pm on December 13, 2017 by Andrea Ruth

Actress and producer Salma Hayek published a stunning New York Times article accounting her relationship, personally and professionally, with Harvey Weinstein throughout the 1990’s and 2000’s.

In the article, Hayek discusses how, as a Mexican actress, she knew she was shooting for the stars in aspiring to become famous and a leading lady in Hollywood.

Hayek writes she had to say no to constant and continuous overtures and harassment from Weinstein.

In my naïveté, I thought my dream had come true. He had validated the last 14 years of my life. He had taken a chance on me — a nobody. He had said yes.

Little did I know it would become my turn to say no.

No to opening the door to him at all hours of the night, hotel after hotel, location after location, where he would show up unexpectedly, including one location where I was doing a movie he wasn’t even involved with.

No to me taking a shower with him.

No to letting him watch me take a shower.

No to letting him give me a massage.

No to letting a naked friend of his give me a massage.

No to letting him give me oral sex.

No to my getting naked with another woman.

No, no, no, no, no …

And with every refusal came Harvey’s Machiavellian rage.

I don’t think he hated anything more than the word “no.”

She describes how her life took a turn for what she thought was an amazing opportunity, but ultimately ended up as a nightmare dealing with Harvey Weinstein.

The range of his persuasion tactics went from sweet-talking me to that one time when, in an attack of fury, he said the terrifying words, “I will kill you, don’t think I can’t.”

When he was finally convinced that I was not going to earn the movie the way he had expected, he told me he had offered my role and my script with my years of research to another actress.

In his eyes, I was not an artist. I wasn’t even a person. I was a thing: not a nobody, but a body.

She goes on to describe the Herculean feats Weinstein made her achieve to get the movie “Frida” made. Ultimately, he would insist upon her performing a lesbian love scene with fellow actress Ashley Judd in order for Miramax to complete the film Hayek had raised millions on her own to make and called in many favors from fellow actors.

He offered me one option to continue. He would let me finish the film if I agreed to do a sex scene with another woman. And he demanded full-frontal nudity.

He had been constantly asking for more skin, for more sex. Once before, Julie Taymor got him to settle for a tango ending in a kiss instead of the lovemaking scene he wanted us to shoot between the character Tina Modotti, played by Ashley Judd, and Frida.

But this time, it was clear to me he would never let me finish this movie without him having his fantasy one way or another. There was no room for negotiation.

I had to say yes. By now so many years of my life had gone into this film. We were about five weeks into shooting, and I had convinced so many talented people to participate. How could I let their magnificent work go to waste?

I had asked for so many favors, I felt an immense pressure to deliver and a deep sense of gratitude for all those who did believe in me and followed me into this madness. So I agreed to do the senseless scene.

I arrived on the set the day we were to shoot the scene that I believed would save the movie. And for the first and last time in my career, I had a nervous breakdown: My body began to shake uncontrollably, my breath was short and I began to cry and cry, unable to stop, as if I were throwing up tears.

Since those around me had no knowledge of my history of Harvey, they were very surprised by my struggle that morning. It was not because I would be naked with another woman. It was because I would be naked with her for Harvey Weinstein. But I could not tell them then.

My mind understood that I had to do it, but my body wouldn’t stop crying and convulsing. At that point, I started throwing up while a set frozen still waited to shoot. I had to take a tranquilizer, which eventually stopped the crying but made the vomiting worse. As you can imagine, this was not sexy, but it was the only way I could get through the scene.

By the time the filming of the movie was over, I was so emotionally distraught that I had to distance myself during the postproduction.

Hayek explains how despite the critical acclaim for the film, the handful of Academy Awards and two Oscars “Frida” added to Weinstein’s company’s resumé, he never again put Hayek in a leading role.

Because, as she states, “It was soul-crushing because, I confess, lost in the fog of a sort of Stockholm syndrome, I wanted him to see me as an artist: not only as a capable actress but also as somebody who could identify a compelling story and had the vision to tell it in an original way.”

Hayek closed by saying that she believes predators will have a home in show business “until there is equality in our industry, with men and women having the same value in every aspect of it.”