Seton Motley | Red State | RedState.com

For some inexplicable reason Snopes.com continues to fact-check the Babylon Bee, even though their website clearly states that they are a Christian satire site. Here’s a recap via Sarah Rumph from last Friday to get everyone caught up on what’s been happening:

And yet, Snopes has been repeatedly attempting to “fact check” Babylon Bee articles, to the point that they were characterizing them as “fake news” and temporarily risked The Babylon Bee losing their status on Facebook (understandably, they are considering legal action).

In fact, just last week, Snopes seemingly attempted to justify their ridiculous fact-checks of the Bee by publishing this “news”:

But if Snopes thought fact-checking the Babylon Bee was going get them to tone down or back down, they were sadly mistaken.

On Wednesday, the Bee upped their game in the Snopes vs. BB war, and the results were hysterically on point:

Here’s what they wrote:

U.S. — A troubling new survey released by The Babylon Bee confirmed Wednesday that too many people think Snopes is a real fact-checking website.

The survey found that over 60% of people believe Snopes is a real website, while only 25% understand that it’s satire. The remaining minority thinks that Snopes is the name of a gangsta rapper from California, “one of those guys who makes the hip-hop about the devil’s lettuce and shooting people.”

In the study, we went to a Walmart and grabbed random people by the arm and started shouting at them: “HEY, DO YOU THINK SNOPES IS REAL!?” The ones who didn’t run away screaming or call for security responded, and of those few dozen people, we got our results.

They hit it out of the park. Fact check that one, Snopes!

Read the full “report” here for a good laugh. 😉

Cartoon - BB Fox

Cartoon via BB Fox.

On a more serious note, Kyle Mann, who is the editor in chief of the BB, penned a must-read at the Wall Street Journal yesterday concerning Snopes‘s attacks on his website:

Life isn’t always “true” or “false,” and mockery, like art, is especially averse to easy labels. Scams and hoaxes are fairly called lies. Opinion and satire involve layers of context and interpretation—and, yes, bias. It’s dishonest for “fact checkers” like Snopes to treat satirical sites like ours as if we claimed to be objective news sources simply in order to saddle us with the “fake news” sobriquet.

Lies claiming to be objective truth are a problem, and sometimes people mistake satire for fact. But let’s not give up our sense of humor just because some “fact checker” pretends not to have one.

Indeed.

——-
— Based in North Carolina, Sister Toldjah is a former liberal and a 15+ year veteran of blogging with an emphasis on media bias, social issues, and the culture wars. Read her Red State archives here. Connect with her on Twitter. –