Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., listens during questioning at a House Oversight and Reform committee hearing on facial recognition technology in government, Tuesday, June 4, 2019, on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

As I wrote a couple of days ago, Never Trumpers like the Washington Post’s Jennifer Rubin have been throwing panicked tantrums about the rise of Sen. Bernie Sander’s presidential candidacy, which has been amusing to watch considering how they have been all in on the left’s “anybody but Trump” mantra for the last 4 years.

It’s even more comical when you see that they are getting rude awakenings on how their new-found “friends” on the left give just about as much of a d*mn about their opinions as their former friends on the right.

But on Thursday, Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY) took a different approach to a contrarian opinion expressed by Rubin. She put the so-called “conservative columnist” on blast, chiding her for characterizing Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) as “mean and angry” at certain points during Wednesday’s presidential debate:

In characteristically dramatic form, AOC went full steam ahead, chastising Rubin for using “misogynistic tropes” when discussing a female politician:

Rubin responded by defending herself in one tweet while practically pleading with AOC to notice her wokeness in the next:

Sadly for Rubin, AOC had already dropped her mic by that point and moved on.

The interesting thing is that Rubin was right on a certain level about picking when to choose to express anger at a political opponent and when to remain calm, and it’s a point that goes for men and women alike. But she’s proven time and time again that she believes the ends justifies her inconsistent and hypocritical means in politics. As a result, few people on either side of the aisle take her opinions seriously anymore.

Sister Toldjah
Based in North Carolina, Sister Toldjah is a former liberal and a 16+ year writer with an emphasis on media bias, social issues, and the culture wars.
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