He was a former helicopter pilot with the forensic police (CICPC) in Venezuela for 15 years before deciding to pilot a craft over the Supreme Court in Venezuela’s capital of Caracas and drop grenades while firing shots at the Ministry of the Interior. No one was injured.

Then he disappeared for seven months.

During his time underground, Oscar Perez, a resistance fighter of the Maduro regime that is currently starving the Venezuelan people and selling their oil reserves to the Castros in Cuba, popped up at anti-government rallies, raided military police posts, and made videos of himself and his followers tying up police and confiscating their weapons.

He also became a hero to a people desperate for one.

Prior to his flight over the Supreme Court, Perez released a video telling anti-government protestors that he was with them and encouraging them to fight.

The video emerged at the height of anti-government street protests and he said he was fighting against President Nicolás Maduro’s “tyranny” and his “narco-dictatorship.”

In the video message, he called on the military, the police and civilians to rise up against the government.

“Together, let’s retake our beloved Venezuela,” Mr Pérez urged. He said his aim was to “re-establish the constitutional order in Venezuela” and “to return the power to the people”.

In the last of his videos uploaded to the photo sharing site Instagram as the siege was under way, he urged Venezuelans “not to lose hope” and to continue fighting for democracy in Venezuela.

On Monday, 150 police were involved in the siege of a house where Perez and the anti-government cell he led had been hiding. Perez posted videos during the 9 hour standoff.

“They’re shooting at us with RPGs [rocket-propelled grenades]. There are civilians inside here. We said we’d turn ourselves in, but they don’t want to let us turn ourselves in. They want to kill us,” Mr Pérez says in Spanish.

Justice Minister Néstor Reverol said Tuesday that Perez was one of seven “terrorists” killed Monday in the siege.