In a press conference Friday with German Chancellor Angela Merkel, President Donald Trump was asked about the increasingly-debunked allegations against his pick to lead the Veteran’s Affairs Administration Admiral/Doctor Ronny Jackson, which include excessive drinking, handing out prescription medication like candy, and even banging on a female colleague’s door while in a drunken stupor.

Trump, in no uncertain terms, expressed his belief Friday in response to a question from a reporter that the allegations were little more than a smear campaign against a man the president considers an American hero for his service to country as the White House doctor. He doubled down on that opinion Saturday when he took to Twitter and called for the resignation of Sen. Jon Tester, who began the inquiry into Jackson by saying he had compiled a folder — or dossier — of bad behavior exhibited by Jackson. As the days have worn on, most of those allegations have proven unsubstantiated or outright false, and Senate Democrats are withholding a report they say details the allegations.

There is some debate regarding just exactly when the behavior alleged by Tester is supposed to have occurred, with much of the information the Senator alleges happened routinely being put to rest as falsehoods by the Trump administration.

The White House had already taken issue with allegations against Jackson, saying Friday that internal records raise doubt about some of the most serious allegations leveled against Jackson. One allegation was that once, at a Secret Service going away party, “Jackson got drunk and wrecked a government vehicle,” according to a summary of accusations compiled by Democrats on the Senate Veterans’ Affairs Committee.

Internal records, including police reports, show that Jackson was in three minor vehicle incidents in government vehicles during the last five years, but none involved the use of alcohol and he was not found to be at fault. In one case, a side-view mirror was clipped by a passing truck. In another incident an enraged driver in Montgomery County, Maryland, allegedly punched out Jackson’s window during a morning drive to Camp David.

The White House medical unit that Jackson ran successfully passed regular controlled substance audits, according to the records for the last three years. The reviews did recommend improvements to the medical unit’s handling of controlled substances, but did not find misconduct.

The Associated Press reviewed the documents Friday. They were the result of an internal White House review of allegations raised against Jackson during his brief confirmation process. The White House says the records, covering recent years, disprove the allegations.

Jackson, who was given A+ ratings by both the Obama and George W. Bush administrations, withdrew his name from consideration last week in the midst of the allegations against him because he said they had become a distraction from the good work the Trump administration is doing.

“If [the allegations] had any merit, I would not have been selected, promoted and entrusted to serve in such a sensitive and important role as physician to three presidents over the past 12 years,” Jackson said in announcing his withdrawal. “Going into this process, I expected tough questions about how to best care for our veterans, but I did not expect to have to dignify baseless and anonymous attacks on my character and integrity.”

As of Saturday, Tester had not responded to the president’s call for his resignation.